Open Days at the GNM: Hancock Museum Library

The Great North Museum: Hanock Library is part of the the Newcastle University Library network and is open to Newcastle University students.  It’s a lovely place to work and has some great resources.  If you’ve never given it a go why not go to their open day and see what you’re missing!

See the Treasures of the Great North Museum: May Open Days

Thursday 12 May at 11.00 and Thursday 26 May at 2.00

See the Treasures of the Great North Museum: Hancock Library and the Archives of the Natural History Society of Northumbria. This includes a chance to see rare and fascinating first editions of books on the history, archaeology and natural history of the northern region and also unique watercolours by the famous wood engraver, Thomas Bewick.

The sessions are free and last for an hour. They take place on Thursday 12 May at 11.00 and Thursday 26 May at 2.00.

How To Book You Place

Please book you place by sending an email to: gnmlibrary@twmuseums.org.uk

Woodcut of Newcastle from the title page of Henry Bourne’s “History of Newcastle Upon Tyne” published in 1736. This book is part of the Library of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle Upon Tyne.

Woodcut of Newcastle from the title page of Henry Bourne’s “History of Newcastle Upon Tyne” published in 1736. This book is part of the Library of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle Upon Tyne

See more information about the GNM: Hancock Library

Making the Archive Public #3 – Women’s Work: Oral Histories of the Women’s Institute

This is #3 of the ‘Making the Archive Public‘ series, where we are showcasing examples from this project, using the rich archive and rare book collections on offer to researchers in the North East.

Women’s Work: Oral Histories of the Women’s Institute

Visit: http://winortheast.omeka.net/

This website was created by Jess Kadow and Shelby Derbyshire as part of the Making the Archives Public: Digital Skills, Research and Public Engagement project at Newcastle University.

The Women’s Work project is a collaboration organised between Newcastle University, the Northumberland Federation of Women’s Institutes and The Northumberland Archives. The project consisted of recording and archiving the oral histories of the North-Eastern WI community, particularly its oldest members, as a means of preserving the tradition and heritage of the Women’s Institute.

The diversity of each woman’s experience with the WI, the changes they have witnessed, the friendships they have made and the activities they have participated in have given this project a great level of depth. This exhibition hopes to showcase its best elements.

 

Making the Archive Public #2 – The Execution of James Maben

This is #2 of the ‘Making the Archive Public’ series, where we are showcasing examples from this project, using the rich archive and rare book collections on offer to researchers in the North East.

The Execution of James Maben

An eighteenth-century execution: Industry and Idleness, Plate XI, 'The Idle 'Prentice Executed at Tyburn', William Hogarth (1747).

An eighteenth-century execution: Industry and Idleness, Plate XI, ‘The Idle ‘Prentice Executed at Tyburn’, William Hogarth (1747).

Visit: http://executionofjamesmaben.omeka.net/about

This project, by Robyn Orr, uses a digitised version of the eighteenth-century pamphlet, A True copy of the papers written by James Maben, held in the Newcastle City Library Special Collections. The themes that are discussed are Newcastle in the Eighteenth Century, Coins and Counterfeiting, and Prisons and Executions.

The pamphlet demonstrates that a single piece of archival material can be used to create a wider narrative (the front page and page 2 from the digitised pamphlet is shown below).

2nd page

Front page

Front page

Page 2

 

Making the Archive Public #1 – William Corbett’s Bookshop

Making the Archives Public was a UTLSEC Innovation Fund (University Teaching, Learning and Student Experience Committee) project in 2014/15. Devised by Dr Ruth Connolly and Dr Stacy Gillis from the School of English with further expertise and access provided by our own Special Collections, Queen’s University Belfast, and local heritage partners, it incorporated traditional curation and digitisation with web based visualisations. As an introduction to some of the concepts behind Digital Humanities, these online exhibitions served to widen the understanding and availability of physical documented heritage to the public.

In this blog series, we will be showcasing examples from this project, using the rich archive and rare book collections on offer to researchers in the North East. 

Here is the #1 in this ‘Making the Archive Public‘ series:

William Corbett’s Bookshop

William Corbett's Bookshop

Visit: http://corbettsbookshop.omeka.net/

This site, created by Claire Boreham, allows users to browse the shelves of a seventeenth-century bookshop.

William Corbett was a bookseller in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the seventeenth century. When he died in 1626, an inventory of his shop was made, listing over a thousand books, mentioning around two hundred of them by name. This is an incredible insight into what books the Newcastle public were buying and reading in the early years of printing, such as Bibles and theological books (an example is shown in the image below).

William Corbett’s will and the inventory of his house and shop are held in Durham University Special Collections and the exhibition also includes rare and unique material from Newcastle University Special Collections, Newcastle City Library, and Queen’s University Belfast Special Collections.

1a

Christopher Barker, “The Bible, that is, the Holy Scriptures, contained in the Old and New Testament,” William Corbett’s Bookshop