OFF THE SHELF – National Poetry Day

Off The Shelf

National Poetry Day marks its 25th anniversary this year with a mass participation campaign that highlights poetry’s power to harness the truth about life.

In commemoration of the event, Teaching Fellow Sue Spencer will be returning to the Law Library and Walton Library to take poetry off the shelf and share some meaningful conversations about the truths that really matter.

Drop in for a one-to-one chat and she’ll offer a listening ear and a poem to inspire, soothe and comfort you!

Wednesday 2nd October, 3-5pm
Law Student Common Area, Newcastle Law School

Thursday 3rd October, 4.40-6.30pm
Walton Library, Newcastle University Medical School

No appointments necessary.

Brought to you in conjunction with the Medicine in Literature and Law in Literature Collections.

Guest post: My first week at NCL Law School

Law Reports

Darby, a third year Law undergraduate, talks about his first week at Newcastle Law School and offers some useful advice for those about to start their Law degree.

About Me

Hello, Darby Okafor here, I am a third year Law Student at Newcastle University and Westlaw Student Representative. Originally from Canada, I came here to study Law because of the prestige associated with a degree from the UK (amongst other things). As an avid reader, I am constantly reading; currently, I am reading Origin by Dan Brown (author of The Da Vinci Code), it is an exciting and engaging page-turner that attempts to answer challenging metaphysical questions. I also enjoy exercising, physically and mentally; I think the latter is as (if not more so) important as the former, for that is what makes us humans—our minds. Meditation is the primary tool I use for doing this, acquired during my pursuit of a career in acting, it has proved to be invaluable. Although that pursuit has come to an end, the lessons and skills I learnt from it continue to benefit me daily and—I think—will continue to do so for the rest of my life.

What were your first impressions Newcastle the city, the University and the Law School?

The City: The city has life to it, there is always something to do, be it during the day when Northumberland street is buzzing with its street performers; its endless shopping options; and, the multitude that seems to always be there. Or at night when the Gateshead Millennium Bridge lights-up and drowns the skies with beautiful colours; or, when the street is packed with party-goers ready for yet another memorable night out on the toon. Whatever your preference, there is much to do.

The University: My first impression of the University was that it had magnificent architecture. Having only visited the main campus on a few occasions, since everything needed for the study of Law is within the Law Building, I must say that it truly is amazing. The famous arch at the very centre of the University campus is known to make for the best backdrop to a picture and this is very true—you should try it.

The Law School: Newcastle Law School is bigger than it appears on the outside. There are multiple levels to traverse, with endless corridors which—surprisingly, to this day—leads me to parts of the School I never knew existed. But although it appears difficult at first, it truly isn’t. Thanks to the sign-posting located throughout the School, finding the offices of staff members is made easier. Knowing the offices of your lecturers, personal tutor, seminarists, etc, is very crucial to your studies as you will soon come to find out.

Do you have any tips for surviving the first week?

The first week can seem like a hassle, the key is to retain as much of the information as possible; the best way to do this is by ensuring you always have a notepad and pen with you. There will be a series of induction lectures in which you learn what to expect from the Law School and what is expected of you—academically and conduct-wise—it is important you listen and take notes during these talks as they are a crucial part of you being a student here at Newcastle Law School. Overall, be attentive and try to absorb as much as you can.

We get you to do a library task in your first week. How did you find doing that?

It was very helpful, it familiarised me with the workings of the library and gave me a flavour of what the study of law would be like. The task was very straightforward and easy to understand but it did require a bit of digging/research which, I think, was a brilliant introduction to the study of Law. Upon completion of the task, I felt better acquainted with the library and its staff, and I have benefited greatly from this. My advice for you when doing this task is to take it as an opportunity to do the same, and also as a chance to make some friends – you might be struggling with a part of the task that someone else isn’t and vice-versa.

What were your overall impressions of the Law Library when you first started – have they changed?

There are a lot of books! Must I read them all? The answer is No. But, I must say, the feeling of being surrounded by books that were printed long before I came into existence gave me a sense of pride. However, the thought that I might have trouble locating them (seeing as there are so many) lingered in my mind, but thanks to the task assigned to us in the first week, that was not the case. At the odd times when I was unable to locate a certain book, journal, report etc., I turned to the library staff for help and they always pointed me in the right direction. Another aspect of the library worth mentioning is its serenity. As Law Students we need our peace and quiet (you will soon come to understand), and the library certainly provides this; in fact, students from other courses occasionally frequent our library for this purpose.

You’ve finished your first year, have you noticed a change in the way you study?

Yes. My study technique has drastically improved – I know what to look for, where to look for it, and how to use it. I struggled with this at the start but as the year went on, and with the assistance and advice of my Professors, Personal Tutor and Peer Mentor, my technique has improved. In addition, the Law School offers a program known as WASP (offered only to first year Law Students), and this was of significant help in improving my study technique. The very aim of the program is to make you more efficient at studying; preparing for seminars; researching and writing for course-work; and, during the exam period, revising, time-management, and much more. It teaches the best way to read articles, cases, etc, the benefits are truly endless. By attending this program, I learnt various things, however, the one which stuck with me the most is – knowing why you are reading what you are reading before you read it. This seems very simple and obvious but the analytically profound way in which it was broken down by the Professors during a particular WASP session, was priceless. Now, I can say very little in this blog post about the benefits of this program, but I strongly recommend WASP to every one of you—thank me later. It greatly—significantly, enormously—improved my study technique.

What do you know now that you wish you had known when you first started?

First, it is not about working hard, it is about working smart. Second, the saying that all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy is true. Working hard is very important – you need to put in the hours because you get out what you put in; but just as important is (if not more so) working smart. This means that you are working on the right task at the right time and dividing your time between that particular task and others appropriately. It will ensure that you are not toiling away to no avail. If you do this correctly, then the thing that comes after hard-work (fun) is justifiable and more satisfying. As you probably know, Newcastle is the city for that—top student city in the UK last time I checked. There are lots to do in this city, you certainly will not be disappointed in that regards, but it feels much better—believe me—when you know you have earned it. So, work-smart and play hard.

What advice would you give to our new Freshers?

Firstly, ensure you become a member of the Eldon Law Society as soon as possible, it is part of the prestige of being a law student and it keeps you up-to-date on vital information tailored to our needs; plus, there are many events hosted by the Society throughout the year i.e. Winter Party, Law Ball, etc., which you do not want to miss out on—believe me. Secondly, you will continually hear (from your peers) that first-year marks do not count, this does not mean take your foot off the pedal. What it means is: this is your chance to figure out how the study of law works. What are the best study techniques, and which one(s) best suits you; what is required of you when writing an essay or a problem question and how this is different in an assessed coursework as compared to an exam; the list goes on. Therefore, attending lectures and seminars, partaking in extra-curricular activities (mooting, client negotiation etc.), utilising office-hours, making use of the library and its staff, visiting your Personal Tutor or meeting with your Peer Mentor; all of these are a part of the process that will help you figure out the best way to go about it. Remember, all these tools have been paid for by you and are there for your benefit—use them. Gathering as much information as you can about the study of Law but more importantly about yourself; becoming a member of the Society so as to stay up-to-date; and, partaking in extra-curricular activities, is what first year is all about. If you do these things, I promise this degree will be smooth sailing for you. Welcome to Newcastle Law School!

Hello from your bibliothēkē

An image of the Venus de Milo

Welcome to all new and returning Classics students from the University Library!

We have a new look library website for you, alongside our Subject Guides with lots of resources for you to explore.

Our Subject Guides give you access to:

  • subject databases and other specialist information sources for your discipline, such as digitised archives and multimedia resources.
  • links to great new learning resources to help you refine your academic skills.
  • our latest blogposts: regularly updated news, tips and features from your Library’s Liaison Team.

You may want to seek out images from the Bridgeman Education database which provides access to over two million images, including paintings, posters, artefacts and photographs, from galleries and collections worldwide. All images are copyright-cleared for educational use, and cover a wide range of themes.

Perhaps you want to browse the Classical Studies eBooks section from Oxford Scholarship Online, or search our Special Collections and explore their Classics resources using their new search function.

If you’re tired from exploring the Campus then kick back and watch a programme dedicated to The History of Empire, the blossoming of art and philosophy in the Ancient World, or listen to Melvyn Bragg discuss the Greek Myths on Box of Broadcasts.

Whatever subject you are reading, explore the possibilities through Library Search, our Library Guides or ask a question via Library Help and we look forward to seeing you in and around the Library soon.

All change for Westlaw UK

Are you a returning Newcastle Law School student? Welcome back!

There have been some changes while you’ve been away (have you seen the Philip Robinson Library? No? Go take a look…!) but importantly for you, Westlaw UK has had a makeover.

Legal research is an essential element of your studies at Newcastle Law School so don’t be put off by the change.

[Source: https://youtu.be/au4byJp_-dc]

You can still browse for cases, legislation, journals (using the Legal Journals Index) and current awareness.

Selecting United States and International sources will launch a new browser window – just change your default Region from UK to US or International.

A screenshot of changing Region in Westlaw UK

See the Get Started guide for an overview.

Read Lucy’s post for more information on the changes: https://blogs.ncl.ac.uk/subject-support/2019/06/20/westlaw-platform-upgrade/.

If you have any questions about the interface, or want a refresher on how to use Westlaw, contact your Student Representative – Darby Okafor. He’ll be announcing details of his Eldon Cluster drop-in sessions for this semester soon via Facebook (@TRFLLNewcastleUniversity) but drop him a line if you need assistance before then: D.Okafor@ncl.ac.uk.

Law Library 101

To all our new students – WELCOME TO THE LAW LIBRARY!
To all our returning students – WELCOME BACK!Welcome to Law Library

During your time here you will need to use all sorts of resources to find:

Cases
Acts
Statutory Instruments
Journal Articles
Textbooks
Reports and Government Publications
And the rest!

We have a lot on our shelves, but also a lot more online.  So, where to start when trying to find what you’re looking for?

THE LAW SUBJECT GUIDE OF COURSE! 

Law Subject Guide

Click on the image above to take you to this one-stop shop of useful links and helpful tips to get you finding what you need.

And don’t forget us – your Law Librarians!  We’re here to help you with whatever we can.  What we don’t know, we’ll find out.

Welcome to the University Library

Welcome

Whether you’re a fresher or a final year student we want to help you get the most from your Library. From discovering resources to finding the right study space, to where to go to get help with your coursework. We’ve made a short video so if you’ve only a few minutes to spare it’s all you need to get started….

 

Transitioning from school to university

Lego person with suitcase getting out of car

Your bags are packed and you are excited to get started at uni, but you may be beginning to wonder what on earth to expect? How does it differ from a school environment? Never fear! We have created a short video just for you and put lots of advice and tips on our transitioning web pages. We’re looking forward to meeting you soon!

P.S. Even if you’re not coming straight from school, some of this advice will still be relevant for you too, so do take a peek.

Spotlight on HS Talks – The Business & Management Collection

HS Talks – The Business & Management Collection includes over 1,200  specially commissioned, online multi-media videos, online lectures, case studies and case study interviews by leading experts in academia, industry and commerce.

Topics include marketing, management, finance, accounting, strategy and more.

The collection is categorised into 6 broad subject areas and further organised into 90 series, each overseen by an editor who is a key expert in the field. Speakers are chosen based on their expertise and each talk is produced together with the speaker especially for the collection. The collection is reviewed and updated monthly.

There are 4 different types of videos on HS Talks :

  • Traditional format lectures with high quality graphics: the lectures are primarily designed to deliver ‘information’. The lectures have multiple associated features including printable slide handouts and speed-up/slow down options.
  • Extended form case studies: accounts of real world experience describing what was done, how, when and with what consequences.
  • Bite-size case studies: these short descriptions of real world commercial activities come with suggested topics for consideration and discussion.
  • Case Study Interviews: interviews with experts from commerce and industry, from start-up entrepreneurs to large corporation executives, confront the challenges they encounter. Each interview is accompanied by suggested topics for discussion and individual and group projects.

A HS Talks Quick Start Guide is available on the Business Library Guide 

This platform is paid for by a subscription by the Business School.

If you need further help with this platform please contact the Social Sciences Liaison Team or the Account Manager for HStalks Noelle Rollings at noeller@hstalks.com