Kick-off your information search

Preparing a dissertation or project?

Before you start, take a look at our interactive Search Planner, part of our Dissertations and research projects guide.

This toolkit takes you through all the stages of developing your search strategy. Step by step, the planner helps you take a closer look at your question, to identify important concepts, themes and keywords. You can keep adding, editing and refining this as you go, and even create and download your own personalised search plan and email it to yourself, your tutor or librarian for feedback

The guide contains further advice on a wide range of relevant skills, such as finding, managing and evaluating information. It also directs you to the key information resources for your subject area. So make sure you check it out.

Resource on trial: International Herald Tribune Archive

Screenshot of newspaper

The Library has trial access to the International Herald Tribune Historical Archive until 2nd March 2020.

This provides the complete archive of this international newspaper, from its first edition in 1887, to 2013. It was originally set up as the European edition of the New York Herald, and became essential reading for Americans living in Europe. It became the International Herald Tribune in 1966.

It was sold in 160 countries, and read worldwide, so offers a uniquely international perspective on events.

As with all Gale newspaper archives, you can search or browse it in various ways (choose Advanced Search to see all options) and you can also use the Term Frequency feature to explore how often a word, phrase or person has been mentioned in the archive over time.

As always, your feedback will be very welcome: you can either email it, or leave a comment on this blogpost.

If you are off-campus, please login to RAS first of all, and then access The International Herald Tribune Archive from a browser within RAS.

Resource on Trial: Global Consumer Survey

The Statista Global Consumer Survey offers a global perspective on consumption and media usage, covering the offline and online world of the consumer. It is designed to help marketers, planners and product managers understand consumer behavior and consumer interactions with brands.

This resource covers more than 50 industries and topics and includes a tool which allows you to analyse data from different topics and customise them.

To access this resource, click on the link here.

For guidance on how to use it effectively, please see the online tutorial here.

The trial is available until 3rd May 2020. As always, your feedback will be very welcome: you can either email it, or leave a comment on this blogpost.

If you are off-campus, please login to RAS first of all, and then access Global Consumer Survey from a browser within RAS.

Journals – Don’t get lost in the darkness

Journals

The Library subscribes to a huge number of journals to assist you with your research. The majority of these are available electronically although we still have some print titles. There are some journals that are only published online with no print and may not have volumes and parts but are identified by DOIs or references numbers.

You can find journal titles by using Library Search. However if you are searching a database, you can use the Find@Newcastle University option, to link straight to Library Search to see if the journal is in stock. In Library Search records for electronic journals say Online access and when you click on them give you options to View Online.

Records for print journal give you a location and shelfmark indicating where the journal can be found.

If you read an article online then you need to reference the article as a Electronic Journal Article not a webpage.

Using the Harvard at Newcastle style a reference from an Online only Journal would look similar to this:

Chan, J.-Y. L., Wang, K.-H., Fang, C.-L. and Chen, W.-Y. (2014) ‘Fibrous papule of the face, similar to tuberous sclerosis complex-associated angiofibroma, shows activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway: evidence for a novel therapeutic strategy?’, PloS one, 9(2), p. e89467.

A reference for a Print Journal would look like this:

Paton, N. (2015) ‘Night work triggers health risks’, Occupational Health, 67(9), pp. 6-6.