Calling all guest bloggers!

We are on the lookout for guest bloggers! We want the blog site to have a range of opinions and discussion points about sustainability-related topics, and we are particularly interested in posts that are topical; we’re not averse to controversial viewpoints, all in the interests of getting a good, healthy debate started!

We are looking for posts that could be used as either a single post or as a mini-series, so if you think you have something suitable please get in touch by e-mailing sustainability@ncl.ac.uk. We look forward to receiving your contributions!

Chilean hydrology – changing patterns

Dr James Bathurst, of the School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences at Newcastle University, has been on sabbatical at the Universidad Austral de Chile at Valdivia during April-August 2013, researching the impact of forest plantation on soil erosion. In this final of a 3 part series, he reflects on the changes in water availability and land use in Chile. This series is based on an article published in the British Hydrological Society’s newsletter Circulation, issue 118, August 2013.

Continue reading

Chilean hydrology – thirst for power

Dr James Bathurst, of the School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences at Newcastle University, has been on sabbatical at the Universidad Austral de Chile at Valdivia during April-August 2013, researching the impact of forest plantation on soil erosion. In this second of a 3 part series, he discusses hydropower and Chilean politics. This series is based on an article published in the British Hydrological Society’s newsletter Circulation, issue 118, August 2013.

Continue reading

Chilean hydrology – setting the scene

Dr James Bathurst, of the School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences at Newcastle University, has been on sabbatical at the Universidad Austral de Chile at Valdivia during April-August 2013, researching the impact of forest plantation on soil erosion.

In this three-part series, he sets the scene of Chilean hydrology and water resources. This series is based on an article published in the British Hydrological Society’s newsletter Circulation, issue 118, August 2013.

Continue reading

Disciplines and cultures collide in Tanzania!

In June 2013, NIReS part-funded medical student Kym Wakefield to undertake research into an entirely different discipline during a field trip to Tanzania. In this thought-provoking account of her stay, Kym gives us an insight into what it is like working in the field collecting data, and how she got on.

Continue reading

Electric Cars: The Final Blog Post – Sustainability of EVs and Your Questions Answered

Welcome to our final blog post on electric cars, in which we’ll be dealing with a couple of questions over the general sustainability of the vehicles, as well as getting the rest of your questions answered that we haven’t managed to get into previous weeks.

Continue reading