Category Archives: Research Informed Teaching

Research-led teaching in Psychology

By Patrick Rosenkranz, Degree Programme Director, Psychology

Teaching in the School of Psychology is guided by empirical research in a number of ways: first and foremost, the design of the programme is research-led ( Healey and Jenkins, 2009):  the syllabus of the modules incorporates both the foundations of the field as well as up-to date developments that include current research problems and practices. Continue reading Research-led teaching in Psychology

Media enhanced learning special interest group

The Media Enhanced Learning Special Interest Group (MELSIG) is a group of academics, learning technologists, staff developers and others whose purpose is to:

  • develop a self-sustaining UK Special Interest Group and community of practice for Media Enhanced Learning that adds value, builds capacity, and stimulates global partnerships and networks;
  • facilitate discussion and dissemination of the pedagogic use, purposes and benefits of digital and social media in post-compulsory education, and to consider its future uses;
  • provide a staff development focal point for media-enhanced academic practice (digital audio, video, smart and social media, and the use of related technologies), from ‘novice‘ to ‘expert’;
  • integrate ‘the student experience’ and ‘student views’ into SIG activities and deliberations;
  • be a resource for pedagogic research and investigation in the areas relating to digital and social media, related new technologies and applications;
  • co-ordinate a network of practitioners;
  • provide information and guidance on practice through its association;
  • provide an annual futures report based on a survey of leading international practitioners in the area of media-enhanced learning.

With a diverse stering group drawn from post compulsory education from all over the UK, it is an active group sharing effective practice widely.

There is already a great set of co-produced resources on the MELSIG website, including :

Regular events (usually free to attend)  provide opportunities for networking with others from different disciplines and institutions to co-produce more toolkits, collaborate and share effective practice. The next event, on 21 June 2018 in Sheffield, focuses on enhancing practice with digital and social media.

There is a jiscmail list which anyone can join.

Using neuroscience research to influence teaching: Could ‘spaced learning’ work in higher education?

By Dr Paul Hubbard, Teaching Fellow, School of Medical Education

Paul Hubbard

Neuroeducation is an emerging educational discipline where a neuroscientific understanding of how the brain learns is used to drive forward current teaching methods or to develop new and innovative methods of teaching and learning.  Whilst neuroeducation does not claim to be a complete solution, it is hoped that an increasing knowledge of the biology behind the process of forming memories in the brain will make teaching methods more efficient.

As this is an interesting topic area for me I decided to submit an abstract to the 2018 learning and teaching conference with the aim to raise the idea of ‘neuroeducation’ and to start a discussion as to whether techniques based on the science of learning could be used in higher education to advance teaching.

Continue reading Using neuroscience research to influence teaching: Could ‘spaced learning’ work in higher education?