School of ECLS: New Springer and Palgrave eBooks

During this academic year we have made available a range of eBook collections from SpringerNature which includes titles from Palgrave.

This system has been using something called Evidence Based Acquisition to select the final purchase of ebooks based on the usage during the trial.

For the School of ECLS we now have available 57 ebooks from this supplier.

The top 5 based on usage are :

The Palgrave International Handbook of Action Research

Graduate Employability in Context

Life in Schools and Classrooms

Bilingual and Multilingual Education

The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Thinking in Higher Education

Please contact the Social Sciences Liaison Team if you wish to see a full list of titles; all are available on our catalogue, Library Search

Business School: New Springer and Palgrave eBooks

During this academic year we have made available a range of eBook collections from SpringerNature which includes titles from Palgrave.

This system has been using something called Evidence Based Acquisition to select the final purchase of ebooks based on the usage during the trial.

For the Business School we now have available 118 ebooks from this supplier.

The top 5 based on usage are :

Development Report on China’s New media

International Business Strategy Perspectives on Implementation in Emerging Markets

Leadership, Innovation and Entrepreneurship as Driving Forces of the Global Economy

New Trends in Finance and Accounting

Strategic Innovative Marketing

Please contact the Social Sciences Liaison Team if you wish to see a full list of titles; all are available on our catalogue, Library Search.

 

New journals for the Business and Management

We now have access to a number of core journals primarily associated with business and management subject areas.

  • Econometric Reviews. ISSN 1532-4168

The journal provides peer reviewed articles and book reviews covering current and developing topics in econometrics and advanced empirical economics, to statistics and other social sciences.  We now have access from volume 16.

  • Ergonomics ISSN 1366-5847

Ergonomics seeks to understand and improve human interactions with products, equipment, environments and systems. Topics covered include human biology, psychology, engineering and design. We now have access from volume 40.

  • International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications ISSN 1469-848X

This journal covers various elements associated with “logistics” including the management of processes, flow of materials and related information along the entire supply chain. We now have access from volume one.

  • Production planning and control ISSN 1366-5871

This journal bring together information on the management of operations in all industries. The journal would benefit researchers interested in operations management supply chain management and business improvement. We now have access from volume 8.

  • International journal of production research ISSN 0020-7543

Contains information on manufacturing, production and operations management research. We now have access from volume 1.

 

Global Affairs journal

Global Affairs is a peer reviewed journal and we now have full text access to the  via Taylor & Francis.  The journal focuses on global affairs including diplomacy, strategy, political economy and policy.  It will:

  • Publish essays on global changes, trends, and politics among nations around the world and their policy implications for Europe
  • Feature contending perspectives on global actors, structures and processes
  • Be a forum for informed debates on European foreign policy
  • Operate a ‘must read’ book review section
  • Publish regular Forum sections i.e. a set of articles on a topical issue in global affairs

You can access Global Affairs via Library Search.
Please explore and send us your feedback.

Architecture and Culture journal

Architecture and Culture is a peer reviewed journal of the Architectural Humanities Research Association, highly recommended by academic staff and researchers at Newcastle University. The journal investigates the relationship between architecture and the culture that shapes and is shaped by it. Whether culture is understood extensively, as shared experience of everyday life, or in terms of the rules and habits of different disciplinary practices, Architecture and Culture asks how architecture participates in and engages with it – and how both culture and architecture might be reciprocally transformed.  It’s now available in full text from volume 1.
To access Architecture and Culture click on the link here to go to Library Search.

Guest post: What it’s like to be a final year Law School student

Law Reports

Michael, a final year Law undergraduate, talks about his time in the Law Library and has some sage advice for first and second years.

About Me

My name is Michael Norris and I am a final year Law undergraduate at Newcastle University, as well as Sports Secretary for the Eldon Society and a Law Library Student Aide. Upon graduation I aim to secure a training contract and practice as a commercial solicitor in London.

What legal resources do you prefer to use, and why?

Personally, I prefer to use print resources. Due to the nature of my course, and most of my study being focused around lengthy case law and statutes, I find it far easier to read print outs rather than on a computer.

The resources I most enjoy engaging with are academic articles and case commentaries. Learning the law and its application to real life scenarios is interesting, but getting to grips with the academic debates behind a concept by reading differing arguments and viewpoints is far more thought-provoking. Reading into a topic in such a way allows me to unlock a new level of understanding and look at a legal problem from a different point of view.

Have you noticed a change over the three years in the way you/your classmates study?

Absolutely! I have realised the importance of reading beyond the textbook and lectures more over my three years at law school. I have also realised the importance of the library and understood how valuable using its wealth of resources is in securing a good grade.

In relation to classmates, over the three years as everybody has become better friends I have noticed an increase in the amount of co-operation between fellow students. Using other students’ knowledge and splitting reading is a really effective way to broaden your understanding of a topic.

I have undoubtedly noticed the increase in students’ work ethics over my time at university. Other than the obvious pressures of finals, I would put this largely down to students’ enjoyment of their third-year option choices. Having the opportunity to study what I am interested in has really motivated me to succeed in third year.

Apart from library resources, what other types of resources do you use for your studies?

Whilst the majority of the resources I use are from the library, it is important to learn from a wealth of resources to keep your work interesting and fresh. In terms of building my commercial awareness, I watch the news every day. It is surprising how relatable current affairs are to your legal studies and future legal careers.

I also make use of my lecturers’ encyclopaedic knowledge during their office hours. Contrary to several pre-conceptions I had prior to university about lecturers being unwilling to help, I can confirm this is completely untrue! Meeting with my lecturers and seminarists on a one-to-one basis has enabled me to ask those questions I did not want to in lectures and they are more than willing to explain any concept I may be struggling with.

Having easy access to relevant case law and statutes is vital to success in any form of law coursework or exam revision. Using online legal databases, such as LexisNexis and Westlaw, allows me to have all the important information at my fingertips to easily access academic articles which allow you to unlock the higher marks.

Away from legal resources, I use an app called “Forest: Self Focus” which locks your phone for a given time to allow you to concentrate on your study. A similar product I use is a computer programme called “Focal Filter” which blocks any website which distracts me, a must when your attention span is as limited as mine!

Do you have a favourite spot in the law library? If so why do you like studying there?

I have favourite parts of the library for different types of study. For revision and essay writing my favourite spot in the law library is undoubtedly the silent study area. I work best when there is nothing at all to distract me. However, the discussion room can be really good when it comes to sharing ideas and opinions with other students or working through exam questions together.

Do you use your Law Subject Guide, and do you find it helpful?

Absolutely. The online subject guide provides me with a convenient shortcut to a variety of vital legal resources. Being able to view all of the legal databases in one place, in addition to portals to eBooks and writing guides is very helpful.

What study advice do you have for 1st and 2nd years?

My first piece of advice would not to be afraid to ask for help. Contrary to what you may believe when you start university, lecturers are not as scary as you may think and have always been willing to help with any problem I have had.

Another piece of advice is to ensure you do not fall behind on your lectures and seminar work. University is a big change from school where learning was more structured, and in comparison, you are given much more freedom over your studies at university. Whilst this free time is often welcome, and it is important to take time away from your studies, keeping on top of work and not falling behind on reading will really come in handy at the end of the year.

A piece of non-legal advice would to take care of yourself generally. University can involve a lot of late nights (especially in first year) and you have nobody to cook for you! It is often forgotten about how important eating well, getting enough sleep and exercise is to performing well in all aspects of life, especially your studies so your health and wellbeing should always remain a priority.

Finally, if there was one thing you could tell your first-year self what would it be?

Whilst first year it is important, as mentioned you will have a lot of spare time in comparison to second and third year. If I could do first year again I would have joined more societies and broadened the number of extra-curricular activities I participated in. Aside from being fun, partaking in societies is a great way to make new friends. Also, if later in university you decide you want to be part of a societies committee joining in first year is a great idea, as participation in a committee looks excellent on any application.

Journal of General Management

The Journal of General Management is now available from 1999 in full text via Library Search. It is a key peer reviewed journal for business students and those studying management and business related subjects and covers strategy, leadership, supply chain management and corporate social responsibility. Click on the link here to go to Library Search.

How to be a Fake News Ninja

As a University student it is imperative that you arm yourself against the barrage of fake news that can be found in today’s media.  To produce academically sound assignments and research, you need to be able identify and evaluate information quickly and with authority.

Here are 10 tips on how you can be a Fake News Ninja:

  1. Be aware: just simply knowing that not all information is created equal is the first step.
  2. Check the source: Where did the information come from? This can be tricky, especially on social media.
  3. Read more: don’t just rely on the piece of information that’s in front of you… go an find another reliable source and see if the facts are the same.
  4. Check the author: Do a bit of Google stalking to see if the author is credible.
  5. Check the references: does the item have references? What sources have they used? Are they credible?
  6. Check the date: watch out for re-posts old news items.
  7.  Check your biases: You own beliefs and prejudices can have an affect on how you accept information.
  8. Is it a joke?: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!
  9. Ask a Librarian: Librarians are the original Fake News Ninjas.  Come and ask us about any reference that you aren’t too sure about and we can help you make an authoritative decision on  the information you use for your research.
  10. Knowledge is power: Read more about Fake News and how you can win the fight. Everything you need to know is in our Fake News Guide.

Read our other blogs on Fake News to be aware of the consequences of Fake News and the history and growth of Fake News.

References
IFLA (2018) How to spot fake news. Available at: https://www.ifla.org/publications/node/11174 (Accessed: 23 March 18)