Welcome to the University Library

Welcome

Whether you’re a fresher or a final year student we want to help you get the most from your Library. From discovering resources to finding the right study space, to where to go to get help with your coursework. We’ve made a short video so if you’ve only a few minutes to spare it’s all you need to get started….

 

Transitioning from school to university

Lego person with suitcase getting out of car

Your bags are packed and you are excited to get started at uni, but you may be beginning to wonder what on earth to expect? How does it differ from a school environment? Never fear! We have created a short video just for you and put lots of advice and tips on our transitioning web pages. We’re looking forward to meeting you soon!

P.S. Even if you’re not coming straight from school, some of this advice will still be relevant for you too, so do take a peek.

Spotlight on OnePetro

Looking for authoritative and comprehensive information on the oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) industry?  Then have a browse of OnePetro! A unique library of technical documents and peer reviewed articles, it includes full text documents of many key conference proceedings in the field and provides access to a number of subject relevant journals.

For a quick introduction to OnePetro, including how to search the database and how to use advanced features, take a look at our helpful video guide (4:49 min):

This video includes sections on:

0:29 – Accessing OnePetro
0:37 – Basic Search
2:57 – Exporting Citations
3:17 – Advanced Search
4:00 – Saving Searches and Setting up Alerts

New resource now available: Kanopy film streaming

We’re pleased to announce that following a successful trial, we now have access to the Kanopy on-demand film-streaming platform.

Kanopy provides access to over 30,000 films, including contemporary and classic feature films from around the world, and documentaries across a range of topics in arts, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. New films are added each month, and you can watch them on your preferred device.

Kanopy is very easy to use: simply search for a film by title, or browse by category. All the films are also individually catalogued on Library Search too, so you can find and access them that way as well.

You’ll find lots of useful features, including creating clips and playlists, viewing the transcript, and rating or adding comments.

Please note, as Kanopy is a ‘pay as you go’ service, we will assess demand during an initial pilot phase. If you’ve got any feedback about Kanopy, we’d be interested to receive it: just drop us an email or post it as a comment on this blog.

Level Up Your Referencing: Cite Them Right

A person writing at a deskYou already know that referencing is important – it not only gives credit to the original creator of a work you have used but also helps to highlight your skills as a researcher; showing that you have read around your topic, found relevant information, applied it to your arguments and used it to develop your own ideas.

However, when it comes to referencing, all of those punctuation rules, different styles and the vast array of document formats can seem overwhelming. Happily, we’ve got a great resource to help you work out your references in three easy steps!

Cite Them Right:

‘Cite Them Right’ is a fantastic referencing guide that provides clear instructions and examples for how to reference a wide range of documents including books, journals, websites and audio-visual materials.  Available as both a physical textbook and an online tool, ‘Cite Them Right’ helps you to format your references correctly using Harvard, American Psychological Association (APA), Modern Humanities Research Association (MHRA), Modern Languages Association (MLA), Oxford Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA), Vancouver or Chicago referencing styles.

(Remember to always use the referencing style recommended by your school.)

Three steps to an accurate reference:
  1. Search for the type of document you want to reference on Cite Them Right online using the search box at the top right of the screen or by browsing the drop down menus at the top of the page.
  2. Select the referencing style you need from the drop down menu at the top of the page.  This defaults to Harvard (author-date).
  3. Follow the example references given, copying the format to create your own reference in the ‘You Try’ box.

Why not have a go and create a reference for this blog post!

If you need some more advice on how to reference, take a look at our video from the Library’s Managing Information guide:

 

 

Future proofing your employability

“What would you guess is the most common job?” Michael Lai, Outreach Lead at KGI, asked an audience of students at his Columbia Heights TEDTalk back in 2016. His audience members offer a few suggestions. “Engineer?” “Fast food workers?”  After several failed attempts, Michael puts them out of their misery,

“3.5 billion truck drivers in the United’s States” he tells them. “Experts predict that in the next 12-15 years, most of the cars on America’s highways will be self-driving… so what’s going to happen to the most common job?”

The future of the job market – and it’s inherent uncertainty – has been receiving a lot of attention in the international press in recent years, with Universities UK analysis predicting “65% of children entering primary schools today will work in jobs and functions that don’t currently exist.”  In previous generations, new graduates could expect to work with the same company for several years, steadily climbing the corporate ladder in a predictable, but reassuring linear way. In the 21st century however, the face of the job market is changing, and once you graduate, you may find yourself looking at a “portfolio career” over traditional career progression – something Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg described as more akin to a career “jungle gym” than a career ladder.

But what does all this talk of truck-driving and emergent markets mean for you, the UK Graduate? Well, if the gig economy becomes the norm in the next 10 years, one of the key challenges for new graduates will be the perpetual need to upskill yourself, and market your own skill base to different employers. This puts the spotlight on what have traditionally been referred to as “soft” transferable skills that are required across many different roles and sectors – skills such as resilience, team-working and critical thinking. Here at the Library, we’d argue that information and digital literacy falls under this bracket (well of course we would, we’re librarians!). The ability to find and use information and make considered use of digital tools is an important capability in any graduate job. Don’t just take our word for it – we spoke to several students returning from placement who told us their information skills had helped them get ahead.

The good news though is that your degree programme offers you the chance to work on and demonstrate all of these skills. Employers will know that you may not have extensive work experience as a new graduate, but make sure you cherry-pick prime examples from your University work, part –time jobs and any voluntary experience to exemplify the skills employers are looking for (and remember, the Careers service can help you with interview preparation.) Make the most of the workshops and sessions open to during your time at University so you are in a great position to articulate these important skills. For more information on how the Library can help, check out our Employability Guide

References

  1. TEDx Talks (2016) Four Key Skills to Lead the Future. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djHTcES2ATg
  2. Universities UK (2018) Solving future skills challenges. 6th August 2018. Available at: https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/policy-and-analysis/reports/Documents/2018/solving-future-skills-challenges.pdf
  3. Sandberg, S as quoted by Lebowitz, S and Campbell, D (2019) “Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon shares his number one piece of advice for millennials who want to get ahead in their careers.” Business insider, Jan 13th 2019. Available at:  https://www.businessinsider.com/career-advice-millennials-goldman-sachs-ceo-david-solomon-2019-1?r=US&IR=T

Spotlight on Compendex

Compendex is one of the best places to go when searching for engineering literature. It provides peer-reviewed and indexed publications with over 20 million records, from 77 countries, across 190 engineering disciplines.

The database includes not only journal articles, but also articles in press, trade magazines, book series, dissertations, as well as a wealth of conference proceedings and conference papers, which are so important in scientific research. In addition, it also includes all technical standards from IEEE.

To access Compendex, you can either go through Library Search or alternatively it may be listed under ‘Journal’s and Database’ section in your library subject guide.

We have put together a short, 9 minute video to take you through the main ways to search this extensive resource.

Roll up, roll up…..

Need to access Business news?….or what about finding TV / audio newsreels? Or alternatively, what about a historic 17th century newspaper article? Our Newspaper Guide directs you to key resources for current, historic, business and international news. Take our 3 minute tour (see video below) to find out more.

Topic Guides: It’s all in the name!

hello my name is....During these winter months of hibernation, we haven’t only been busying ourselves with updating our subject guides, but we have also been sprucing up our topic guides as well. But what are topic guides I hear you ask?! How are they different from subject guides?

Well, while they do complement the subject guides, they differ in the sense that these guides group resources together not by subject but erm….by topic! It’s not complicated I promise, but they do neatly fall into three main types……

Type 1: These guides deal with how to find specific types of information you might need, whether that be company information, newspaper articles, standards, government publications or theses and dissertations…the list goes on.

Type 2: The second type of topic guides are those guides which have been created with a specific end product / piece of work in mind. For example, you may have been asked to create an academic poster, write a dissertation or undertake a systematic review and you might not know where to start or what these formats of work should even look like.

And last but not least……………….

Type 3: These are the guides which focus on academic skills and often include teach yourself material in the form of workbooks, quizzes and videos etc.

So what you are waiting for, go and check out our fabulously named topic guides, because they do exactly what they say on the tin!

Or if you fancy relaxing and letting us do the tour for you, why not crack open the popcorn and check out our whistle stop tour below!

Happy exploring!

Be better than the Google

Fed up of  struggling to find suitable resources for your assignment? Annoyed at Fake News plaguing your web browser? Be gone the days of relying on good ol’ Google to solve all your problems.  What you want is reliable, credible, and most importantly relevant information…and when do you want it? You want it NOW!

Never fear, your faithful Newcastle University librarians have curated your Subject guides. These guides are subject related collections of resources that give you access to eBook/book collections, databases, eJournal collections, and specialist resources to help you with your studies.

All the guides have the same layout which will hopefully help you navigate between multiple guides. So, watch this short 3 minute video tour and remember to bookmark them:

Repeat after me… “Be better than the Google”