New resource now available: Kanopy film streaming

We’re pleased to announce that following a successful trial, we now have access to the Kanopy on-demand film-streaming platform.

Kanopy provides access to over 30,000 films, including contemporary and classic feature films from around the world, and documentaries across a range of topics in arts, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. New films are added each month, and you can watch them on your preferred device.

Kanopy is very easy to use: simply search for a film by title, or browse by category. All the films are also individually catalogued on Library Search too, so you can find and access them that way as well.

You’ll find lots of useful features, including creating clips and playlists, viewing the transcript, and rating or adding comments.

Please note, as Kanopy is a ‘pay as you go’ service, we will assess demand during an initial pilot phase. If you’ve got any feedback about Kanopy, we’d be interested to receive it: just drop us an email or post it as a comment on this blog.

Trial: Oxford Bibliographies Online

We have a trial of Oxford Bibliographies Online until April 8th 2019.

This resource offers exclusive, authoritative research guides written by academic experts across a variety of subject areas. Combining the best features of an annotated bibliography and a high-level encyclopedia, it directs you to the best available scholarship across a wide variety of subjects in humanities and social and environmental sciences.

You can search or browse it in various ways, and new content is added regularly.

The trial ends on April 8th. Please explore and email us your feedback, or post it as a comment on this blog.

Lexis: Full Academic Library now available

We’re pleased to announce that we have recently upgraded our Lexis subscription to their Full Academic Library.

This provides access to an extensive range of new content (almost 500 new online sources), including practitioner textbooks and major works in many areas of law, such as finance, taxation, criminal, consumer, planning, housing, and family law.

The new content will be individually catalogued on Library Search soon, but for now, the best way to access it is via Lexis itself. You’ll find the new content in the relevant sections of Lexis (e.g. in Forms and Precedents, Commentary or My Bookshelf).

To browse or search a full list of Lexis content in all categories, click on Sources in the top right hand corner.

Trial: Irish Times and Weekly Irish Times

We have trial access to this digitised newspaper archive from Proquest until May 26th 2019.

It contains full content of the Irish Times from 1859-2015 and the Weekly Irish Times from 1876-1958.

Explore nearly 150 years of Ireland’s history, rich culture and complex political
climate, from the aftermath of the Great Famine, the launch of the Titanic, the Easter Rising of 1916, to the World Wars, the Troubles, and today’s most pressing global social issues.

The trial ends on May 26th. Please explore and email us your feedback, or post it as a comment on this blog. If you are off-campus, you will need to log in to RAS first of all, and then access this page from within RAS.

Literature Online upgrade

The literary research database, Literature Online (LION) has had an exciting new upgrade.

LION, which enables you to research international literature of all genres in books and journals, together with 350,000 works of poetry, prose and drama from the 8th century to the present, is now hosted on Proquest’s main platform. It also has good coverage of related areas such as linguistics, philosophy, classics and film studies.

The new site includes the following improvements:

  • new content will be available more quickly
  • clearer search options to help you focus your search
  • improved author pages
  • you can now cross-search LION along with other Proquest databases, such as Early English Books Online, The Guardian/Observer/New York Times newspaper archives, plus thousands of journal articles in other subject areas.

Not quite ready to switch? The old LION platform will still be available until August 2019, but we would encourage you to try the new LION sooner rather than later!

New resource “Statista” available

We now have access to platform called Statista which is available through a subscription from the Business School.

This is an extensive statistics platform covering over 1.5 million data sets (and adding an additional 500 each day) with revenue forecasts from 2015 to 2020 on over 400 industries.

Data is collected from over 18,000 sources covering over 75,000 different topics.

The platform can broken down into different elements including :

  • Statista‘s Digital Market Outlook offers forecasts, detailed market insights and key performance indicators for the most important areas of the Digital Economy, including various digital goods and services. https://www.statista.com/outlook/digital-markets
  • Statista’s Consumer Market Outlook provides in-depth market insights, key performance indexes and forecasts for the most important consumer markets. https://www.statista.com/outlook/consumer-markets
  • Statista’s industry reports provide the facts needed to understand an industry. The reports are clearly structured, easy to understand and present not only numerical data on areas such as trends in turnover and revenue, but also on industry strengths and weaknesses.  Updated annually, these reports contain the most recent and relevant data. https://www.statista.com/industry-reports
  • Statista’s dossiers are in-house reports which contain the most recent and relevant statistics concerning a single subject. Regular updates and routine additions ensure that Statista’s 4,000 dossiers are always up to date https://www.statista.com/dossiers

This short video from Statista give a nice overview of the different search functionalities – https://vimeo.com/202712374

Access via https://www.statista.com/ or via the record on Library Search.  (If you are accessing on campus, the platform will authenticate using IP address. If you are accessing off campus you will be taken through EzProxy so access should be seamless if you’ve logged in previously using your Campus ID and password).

New resource in focus: Oxford Scholarly Editions Online (Romantics Poetry)

We have recently added a new module, Romantics Poetry, to our Oxford Scholarly Editions Online (OSEO) collection.

OSEO enables you to explore old works in new ways. It brings together authoritative editions of major works, so you can explore variations between editions, annotations and extensive notes side by side with the texts, or you can just read the texts on their own.

The new module means we now have access to 272 Oxford editions, containing 344 works, including poetry, prose, drama, essays and correspondence, in the following categories: Romantics Prose; Romantics Poetry; 18th Century Drama; 18th Century Prose.

You can browse by work, edition or author, or search in highly specific ways (e.g. just search within notes or stage directions) to pinpoint exactly what you want. The editions are individually catalogued on Library Search, but we’d recommend searching for works and editions via the OSEO interface itself.

Various export and personalisation options are available.

If you haven’t used OSEO before, we’d strongly recommend watching this introductory video, so you can understand the potential of this resource and how to use it.

Have you used Oxford Scholarly Editions Online? Please feel free to post your comments and experiences by clicking Leave a comment below.

New resource in focus: Oxford Scholarship Online Classical Studies

We recently bought the Classical Studies module of this collection, which currently contains 117 titles written by leading scholars in the field.

All the books are individually catalogued on Library Search, or you can browse them as a whole collection on the OSO site. Coverage includes literature, culture and history, and new titles will be added at intervals.

New resource in focus: Race Relations in America

Continuing our series of blogposts exploring our brand new humanities e-resources in more depth…

We have recently bought access to Race Relations in America. This is a collection of primary source material covering Civil Rights in the USA from 1943-1970.

This archive contains a huge range of primary sources. Before you dive in, we’d recommend clicking Introduction, in which you can learn more about its scope and features.

The sources come from the records of the Race Relations Department of the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries in New Orleans, and comprise many different types of material, including pamphlets, audio recordings, survey data, photographs and speeches. These sources are supplemented by secondary materials such as contextual essays, maps and thematic guides to give you ideas for interpreting and exploiting the archive.

You can browse or search the archive contents by clicking Documents (to browse) or one of the two search options. You can filter your search in various ways, e.g. by document type, year or theme. If you just want to view images or listen to audio, click the relevant buttons on the top menu.

Have you used Race Relations in America? Please feel free to post your comments and experiences by clicking Leave a comment below.

New resource in focus: African American Communities

Continuing our series of blogposts exploring our brand new humanities e-resources in more depth…

We have recently bought access to African American Communities. Focusing predominantly on Atlanta, Chicago, St. Louis, New York, and North Carolina, this collection presents multiple aspects of the African American community in the 19th and 20th centuries, through pamphlets, newspapers and periodicals, photographs, correspondence, official records and oral histories.

This archive contains a huge range of primary sources. Before you dive in, we’d recommend clicking Introduction, in which you can learn more about its scope and features.

The primary sources include many different record types, including pamphlets, images (including 360 degree view), official records and oral histories. These sources are supplemented by contextual essays to give you ideas for interpreting and exploiting the archive.

You can browse or search the archive contents by clicking Documents (to browse) or one of the two search options. You can filter your search in various ways, e.g. by document type, year or theme. If you just want to view images, click Image Gallery.

Have you used African American Communities? Please feel free to post your comments and experiences by clicking Leave a comment below.