Resource on trial: Archives of Sexuality and Gender

NB Trial access extended for one more month!

The Library has trial access to Gale’s Archives of Sexuality and Gender until May 31st 2020.

This is a significant collection of digitised primary source material dating from the 16th to 21st centuries. It comprises four archives:

LGBTQ History and Culture Since 1940, Part I

LGBTQ History and Culture Since 1940, Part II

Sex and Sexuality, Sixteenth to Twentieth Century

International Perspectives on LGBTQ Activism and Culture

The digitised materials include rare books, correspondence, newsletters, photographs and campaign materials from a wide range of organisations around the world. Read a more detailed description of the four archives.

As with all Gale resources, you can search or browse the materials in various ways. You may find it helpful to start off by clicking Collections on the home page for an overview of the different collections which make up each archive.

As always, your feedback will be very welcome: you can either email it, or leave a comment on this blogpost.

New dataset – Digimap Pilot

A new dataset is now available within Digimap called the Pilot Collection. This provides temporary access to data that EDINA are trying out and want feedback from users. This means the data will be replaced with other data sets over time as new sets become available.

Digimap Pilot is free for staff and students at current subscribing higher and further education institutions and research councils. All you will need to do is to accept the end user licence agreement which is available when you log into Digimap with your Campus ID and password. As these datasets will change regularly then you’ll need to re-accept each new licence agreement as sets are replaced.

Digimap Pilot comprises two applications, one for creating maps online, the other for downloading data which enables further analysis and investigation in other packages:

  • Use Roam to view, annotate and print maps online.
  • Use Data Download to download data and load it into a GIS or CAD package for further manipulation

As of April 2020, Pilot currently offers access to the following data.

Geomni data which consists of:

  • UKMap a modern, highly detailed, feature-rich mapping database of Greater London. Its unique, innovative design offers users a flexible choice of integrated map features within a single geographic information source.  It comprises addresses, retail names, detailed shopping centre data, building heights, a wide range of points of interest, aerial photography, together with Digital Terrain and Surface Models.
  • This one dataset has different components for Greater London. This includes UKMapLondon which provides aerial imagery with a resolution of 10cm, UKMap Upper Floors which shows more granular information e.g. which shops are on different floors of shopping centres, UKMap Tree Canopy which indicates tree canopies.
  • UKBuildings a unique database created and regularly updated to help you understand the age, structure, characteristics and use, of commercial, public and residential buildings across the UK.
  • UKLand a maintained, national land information database providing a detailed consistent breakdown of the use of land across the UK. There are 30 different land classes available e.g. woodland, water features, transport and commerical.

An EDINA Satellite data collection initially consisting of:

  • Sentinel 2 derived cloud free optical mosaic for Great Britain, 2019.
  • Sentinel 2 derived Near Infrared mosaic for Great Britain, 2019.

These 2 sections are currently available until the 31/07/2020.

Within the Pilot Data Download section you’ll also find some useful product information such as where the data comes from, it’s availability and sizing and Copyright information.

If you’re using mapping data already you might want to use this in conjunction with GIS if you’re manipulating or working with the data. Or doing a comparison to other maps you might have found freely available e.g. Google Maps.

10 online resources for Politics students.

We’re studying in unprecedented times right now and when completing upcoming assignments, you may need to look beyond your reading list to explore quality resources available online. Here are some of our suggestions to help you find the information you need.

1. Library Search for ebooks and articles

When working off campus, you can still access the full collection of ebooks, electronic journals and professional magazines, newspapers, conferences and more, from Library Search.

Additional ebook titles are being added to the collection every day while we are all working remotely. Search by author, title or keyword to find books to help you with your essay topic.

We’ve put together a page of tips and help videos all about Library Search on our finding information skills guide .

To find academic journal articles from across our collection that match your topic keywords, use the everything search option and filter your results on the left to peer-reviewed journals.

Watch our introduction to the main Library Search features.

2. Your Subject Guide

The Subject Guide for Politics draws together in one place, the resources available from the library to help you with your academic work. Use the Journals and Database page to access subject databases such as Social Sciences Premium Collection and JSTOR.

The Social Sciences Premium Collection is a brilliant place to start if you would like to refine your results to politics and the social sciences, while still searching broadly across different information types.

Find out more about the Social Sciences Premium Collection, how to search it successfully and use the advanced features. It is a brilliant resource for politics.

You can contact the Liaison Team for one-to-one support or send your questions to Library Help, where there are staff logged into our live chat service, 24/7.

Between Library Search and your Subject Guide, you will be able to find excellent information to use in your academic essays, but there are many other resources you may want to try.

3. JSTOR

JSTOR is a full-text collection, giving you online access to scholarly journals, books and book chapters in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

It has basic and advanced search options that allow you to search by topic keyword, author, subject area, title or publisher

Screenshot showing the JSTOR homepage

4. Scopus

Scopus is a large, multidisciplinary database, which indexes peer reviewed journal articles, books, book chapters, conference proceedings and trade publications.

One of the main advantages of using Scopus is that it provides a lot of useful information about the articles it indexes. This includes full reference lists for articles and cited reference searching, so you can navigate forward and backward through the literature to uncover all the information relevant to your research.  

You can also set up citation alerts so you can be informed of new, relevant material automatically. Other useful tools include citation overviews, author and affiliation searching, visual analysis of search results, a journal analyser, and author identifier tools (if you are interested in publishing work).

Watch this video from Scopus about how to expand your search from a known article reference.

5. Government publications

Government publications provide information in a variety of subjects. Statistics, White Papers, Parliamentary Bills and a whole range of Official Legislation published by the Government provide a good, reliable, source of accurate statistics, and can give support to your argument in essay topics.

We have put together a resource guide for government publications that will give you quick access to the United Kingdom gov.uk publications search and the Office For National Statistics, European and international official publications.

6. OECD iLibrary for statistics and global reports.

OECD iLibrary is the online library of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and gives you access to booksanalytical reports and statistics, covering a broad range of topics relevant for studies in politics.

  • Agriculture and food
  • Development
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Employment
  • Energy and nuclear energy
  • Environment
  • Finance and investment, taxation and trade
  • Industry and services
  • Science and technology
  • Social Issues / Migration / Health
  • Transport
  • Urban, Rural and Regional Development

OECD iLibrary is certainly worth searching to provide reputable supporting information for your academic work.

7. Statista for easy statistics and global outlook

Statista is an extensive statistics platform covering over 1.5 million data sets. It includes reports, statistics and forecasts on a range of topics. So if you want to know which social media platforms are most popular across the globe, compare homelessness statistics, explore industry trends or how many people play video games, Statista is a brilliant place to start.

Statistics and reports can be exported in a range of formats including images and PowerPoint, giving you flexibility to include the visuals in your assignments. The statistics source is included, giving you the information that you need to cite it successfully.

Find out more about Statista with this brief introduction.

You will find a similar sources on our Statistics and Market Research resource guides.

8. Current newspapers with LexisLibrary

Newspapers are an excellent resource to explore, to provide a range of perspectives on a topic. You can find opinion pieces, social commentary and identify trends in public opinion.

We have a range of newspaper resources available from the Library, and LexisLibrary is an excellent place to start. It provides access to UK national and regional newspapers, from the 1990s to today. It includes the copy text without the images or formating and all of the details you need to create a citation are on the article page.

Once you have followed the Library Search link to access Lexis, make sure you click on News at the top of the page for full text access to all UK publications.

As so many articles are published every day, you will need to refine your searching using date ranges, combined keywords or by selecting specific newspapers or publication type (i.e. broadsheet or tabloid).

Remember to use your critical skills when using newspapers however, and watch out for Fake News. They are so biased sources and are best used in balance with other sources. You can find our tips on our Evaluating Information skills guide.

9. Newspaper archives and international news

We have a huge range of newspaper archives, historic newspapers and international sources such as Nexis that can mostly be access online and off campus. Our Newspapers resource guide collates all of our resources and will guide you through how where to look.

If you want to search across a range of newspapers, we suggest you start with Gale Primary Sourcesas this gives access to nearly all our British newspaper archives, except for The Guardian and The Observer.

10. Box of Broadcasts

Box of Broadcasts can be used to access TV and radio broadcasts from over 65 channels, including most of the UK’s freeview network, all BBC TV and radio content from 2007, and several foreign language channels. It’s a great resource to use to find documentaries or critical opinions.

You can view archived programmes, record new ones, create clips and playlists and see transcripts to help with citation and translation. You can also search for other user’s public playlists to help you in your own search. 

Unfortunately, Box of Broadcasts is not available outside the UK.

17 useful online resources for architecture essays.

1. Online resources in Library Search

When working off campus, you can still access the full collection of ebooks, electronic journals and professional magazines, newspapers, conferences and more, from Library Search.

Additional ebook titles are being added to the collection every day while we are all working remotely. Search by author, title or keyword to find books to help you with your essay topic.

We’ve put together a page of tips and help videos all about Library Search on our finding information skills guide

2. Your Subject Guide

The Subject Guide for Architecture, Planning and Landscape draws together in one place, the resources available from the library to help you with your academic and design work. Use the Journals and Database page to access subject databases such as Avery and Building Types Online.

The Subject Specific Resources page gives you a curated list of good quality image and buildings websites which will be great to reference in your essays.

You can contact the Liaison Team for one-to-one support or send your questions to Library Help, where there are staff logged into our live chat service, 24/7.

Between Library Search and your Subject Guide, you will be able to find excellent information to use in your essay, but there are many other resources you may want to try.

Screenshot showing the subject guide homepage.

3. RIBA ebooks

The Library recently purchased 89 ebook titles, available through a partnership between RIBA and Taylor & Francis. You can access the RIBA ebooks in Library Search when books match your keywords, or you can find a full list on our recent blog post.

Screen shot showing RIBA ebook platform for reading online.

4. Building Types Online

Find excellent quality building examples for your academic work. The database includes case studies, articles, essays, building plans and photographs for different building types and construction methods. You can find out more about

5. Avery Index to Architectural

Published by the Getty Research Institute, the index is a comprehensive American guide to the current literature of architecture and design. It surveys more than 2,500 international journals and provides nearly 13,000 citation records for architects’ obituaries. Some of the articles have full-text attached, while others will link using the Find@Newcastle University button to take you back to Library Search to access the full-text if we have it.

You can filter your results to scholarly journals or the wider professional collection.

6. Art and Architecture Archive

A full text, full colour archive of 25 art and architecture magazines from the 19th to 21st centuries. You can search across the whole archive or individual magazines.

7. Architects Journal Buildings Database

The AJ Buildings Library is a digital database that showcases more than 1,900 exemplar projects, most from the last 20 years but including major projects back to 1900.

When accessing the database for the first time, you will need to set up an account using your Newcastle email on the Architects Journal website. Click on Sign In at the top left of the homepage, and then register, to complete the form. You will be able to log in to the Buildings Database.

You can search for projects by age, cost, architect, building type, footprint, location, and a combination of these. Each project featured in this digital database includes full project data (more than 20 items of information) and comprehensive architectural photographs and drawings (plans, elevation, section) – all provided at high resolution.

Drawings can be downloaded and printed out to their original scale. Vector pdfs and CAD files are not available for download and all copyrighted images are protected.

8. Box of Broadcasts

Box of Broadcasts can be used to access TV and radio broadcasts from over 65 channels, including most of the UK’s freeview network, all BBC TV and radio content from 2007, and several foreign language channels. It’s a great resource to use to find documentaries or critical opinions.

You can view archived programmes, record new ones, create clips and playlists and see transcripts to help with citation and translation. You can also search for other user’s public playlists to help you in your own search. 

Unfortunately, Box of Broadcasts is not available outside the UK.

9. JSTOR

JSTOR is a full-text collection, giving you online access to scholarly journals, books and book chapters in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

It has basic and advanced search options that allow you to search by topic keyword, author, subject area, title or publisher

Screenshot showing the JSTOR homepage with basic search

10. ArchDaily

ArchDaily is a great resource that provides news and information from around the world on all aspects of architecture. Founded in 2008, is is one of the biggest and most popular architecture websites in the world.

You can keyword search across the website, or use the browse options to find information about hot topics, different types of architectural project. The interviews section is well worth exploring.

11. Internet Archive

Internet Archive is a non-profit library of millions of free books, videos, music, websites, and more. You can do a simple keyword search around your topic area, and refine by the information type. Or search within the ebooks for specific titles.

Screenshot of Internet Archive search results for concrete architecture

12. US Modernist Library

The USModernist Library is the world’s largest open digital collection of major US 20th-century architecture magazines with approximately 2.7 million downloadable pages – all free to access. You can search for a specific modernist house, search by architect, original owner or keyword.

13. RIBApix

RIBA’s image library of over 100,000 photographs and drawings
from the RIBA Collections, available to view, buy and download. Many of the images are protected by copyright so will need to be used with caution.

14. Architectural Association photo Library

With over 8,000 images, the slides, negatives and prints of historical and contemporary architecture are all available in low resolution for educational purposes. It also includes photographs of work produced by students at the School of Architecture since the 1880s, as well as a video archive for its lectures, conferences, and seminars.

15. Pathé Newsreel Archive

Access over 85,000 high res videos on the British Pathe Youtube channel. The archive contains films produced from 1910 to 1970, and covers all sorts of subjects relating to architecture. Watch features on the construction of the Empire State BuildingFrank Lloyd Wright’s Johnson Wax BuildingLe Corbusier’s Couvent de la Tourrette, and Montreal’s Expo’ 67 and the construction of Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome.

16. archINFORM

This is the largest online-database about worldwide architects and buildings, including information about more than 81,000 built and unrealised projects. The information varies for each project but includes images, commentary, drawings and links to references to read more about the project.

You can search the database using your topic keywords, or by architect, building name or location.

17. Construction Information Service

CIS is produced jointly with the National Building Specification (NBS) especially for architects, civil and structural engineers, building control officers, building services engineers and other professionals in the construction industry. It provides industry information and legislation, along with full-text access to key professional publications, including Architects Journal.

The full-text documents cover all aspects of the building, engineering, design and construction process.

Spotlight on IOP eBooks

Institute of Physics Ebook collections offer high-quality research across physics and related disciplines. They have been created to meet the needs of students, early-career researchers and established leaders in the fields.

An additional 255 IOP ebooks covering subjects such as astronomy, particle and nuclear physics, medical physics and biophysics, quantum science and more have just been added to the Library’s collection.

If you find a title that we don’t have full-text access to and you would like us to add it to the collection, just use our Books on Time form available on the Library website to request it.

Gartner Core Reports and Insights

​​​​The Gartner CEO has released a statement regarding the work they’re doing to support students and researchers during these challenging times. They have launched the new COVID-19 Resource Center so you can get regular updates on what is happening with the virus.

They are putting an additional emphasis on critical topics including navigating the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, business continuity planning, supply chain management, managing a remote workforce, and financial impacts.
In addition, Gartner have expanded access to include relevant content across the enterprise – HR, Supply Chain, IT, Finance and more.

For help and advice on finding information relating to your research, please contact your Liaison Librarian as we remain available to support you remotely.

We are here to help (even when you’re working off campus)

As the University monitors the situation around the spread of Covid-19 (Coronavirus), the Library is working to ensure that you have access to the resources and academic skills support you need to continue your studies while off campus. 

The information and links on this page provide guidance on how to engage with our wide range of online materials and how to make the most of our helpful online guides and tools from wherever you choose to study. 

Library Search: your first point of call

Use Library Search to quickly and simply access a wide range of eBooks, eJournals, and databases off campus. Check out our Library Search video on how to get the best out of this resource. 

Subject and Resource Guides

If you are not sure which resources are best to use for your subject or what you can access off-campus, visit your Subject Guide . The guides bring together links and help for the specialist information sources in your discipline. Access our Resource Guides for different types of information you may need in your research. These include guides to business casescompany and market informationgovernment publicationsgrey literaturemapsnewspaperspatentsstandards
statistics,  theses and dissertations, plus much more.  

Develop your skills, at a time that suits you

Use our FindingEvaluating and Managing Information guides to boost your search skills and help you achieve the best results in your assignments whilst working remotely. If you are needing help with academic writing and reading or even numeracy, maths and statistics, then don’t forget their are lots of downloadable resources available at the ASK website.

Dissertation support

If you are in the midst of writing or planning a dissertation then our our Dissertation Guide is a great place to guide you with your literature search.  Not only do we have videos, quizzes and advice, but we also have an interactive Proposal Planner and Search Planner to help you get organised and create a focus for your research.  We can even give you feedback once you’ve filled the planners in. Just send them through when prompted or email them to your supervisor for advice and help.

Have a question? Check the FAQs

We have an extensive database of frequently asked questions available on the Library website. You can search by keyword or browse by topic area and find answers to the most common questions. So whether you want to know how to access newspapers or get help with EndNote, check the FAQs to see if we have already answered your question.

Contact Library Help

If you need help or have a question, use Library Help to get in touch with us. We are still here for you 24/7 and you can chat with us online or email us as normal. You can also keep in touch with us via social media.

So remember, you can access all of our online resources, journals and ebooks from the Library website.

Photo by Allie Smith on Unsplash

Getting the most out of eBooks

Woman reading on an eReader device.

We have over 6 million eBooks accessible through Library Search, including titles that feature on your reading lists, or those that have been recommended by staff and students. Sometimes we buy them through large bundle deals with specific publishers so we gain access to lots of research titles all at once.

Why Use eBooks?

eBooks are incredibly useful resources as they are available 24/7 from any location, work with most devices and some come with snazzy features such as keyword searching, annotation options, links to other relevant information, and reading aloud facilities to name but a few.

How do eBooks Work?

As we get eBooks from different platforms and providers you might see a different layout each time you access one of our titles but the logic is the same. You can navigate using a toolbar, you can normally turn pages using little arrows at the top or side of the page, you can jump to specific chapters and in some cases, print or download all or some sections of the eBook to read offline.

Unfortunately, one thing you can’t do with eBooks is download and save offline a copy of the book to keep forever, there are usually some download restrictions. This is because we have subscriptions or licence access to titles but we don’t own the title. There is something called Digital Rights Management where publishers can control the copying, pasting and downloading of their content, this is linked to issues with privacy and copyright.

How do I access eBooks?

Simply navigate to Library Search and enter your keywords to look for a book title as usual. Library Search is the best way to access resources whether you’re on or off campus as it makes sure you’re logged in correctly and can access resources simply and quickly.

From your search results, choose an eBook which looks relevant e.g. Essentials of Business Research Methods by Hair, which we know is popular book for Business students doing dissertations. If you are off campus, you will need to sign in with your University ID and Password.

Once the eBook has loaded on the screen, hover over the functionality buttons to see what they do. For example; the search option will be useful if you’re looking for specific topics; use the Table of Contents to navigate straight to a chapter you’ve been told to read, or select the paint pallet to change the colour of the background to help with your reading.

Not all titles are available in eBook format for an institutional library to purchase, but if you’d prefer a title in electronic format we can certainly investigate. Just let us know by recommending a title via Books on Time.

RIBA eBook collection now available

We now have 89 eBook titles available through a partnership between RIBA and Taylor & Francis.

This is the first time these titles have been made available on a unlimited DRM free model.

All titles are available through our catalogue, Library Search.

Follow the links to the platform which supply that title e.g. the large blue button to the “Royal Institute of British Architects Books”

Once you are transferred to the Taylor and Francis platform you will see options to navigate to specific chapters or content, download read online. Once you’re inside the eBook then you can keyword search, make the text size larger/smaller or jump into chapters.

The full list of titles includes :

101 Rules of Thumb for Low Energy Architecture
101 Rules of Thumb for Sustainable Buildings and Cities
20/20 Visions
A Gendered Profession
Age-friendly Housing
An Architect’s Guide to Public Procurement
An Introduction to Architectural Conservation
An Introduction to Passive House
Architect’s Guide to NEC4
Assembling a Collaborative Project Team
Automatic for the City
Avoiding and Resolving Disputes
Being an Effective Construction Client
Better Buildings
BIM Demystified
Biomimicry in Architecture
Briefing
Building Condition Surveys
Building in Arcadia
Building Revolutions
CDM 2015
Chinese Urban Transformation
Climax City
Commercial Client’s Guide to Engaging an Architect
Competition Grid
Conservation
Construction
Contemporary Vernacular Design
Contract Administration
Creating Winning Bids
Demystifying Architectural Research
Design
Design for Biodiversity
Design for Climate Change
Design Management
Designed to Perform
Desire Lines
Domestic Client’s Guide to Engaging an Architect
Extensions of Time
Financial Management
Future Campus
Future Office
Future Schools
Good Office Design
Guide to JCT Design and Build Contract 2016
Guide to JCT Intermediate Building Contract 2016
Guide to JCT Minor Works Building Contract 2016
Guide to JCT Standard Building Contract 2016
Guide to RIBA Domestic and Concise Building Contracts 2018
Guide to RIBA Professional Services Contracts 2018
Guide to the RIBA Domestic and Concise Building Contracts 2014
Guide to Using the RIBA Plan of Work 2013
Happy by Design
Health and Safety
How Buildings Work
HR for Creative Companies
Information Exchanges
Lead Designer’s Handbook
Light in Architecture
Loft Conversion Handbook
Mediated Space
Mobilising Housing Histories
New Design for Old Buildings
Planning, Politics and City-Making
Principal Designer’s Handbook
Re-readings: 2
Rescue and Reuse
Residential Retrofit
Retrofit for Purpose
Retropioneers: Architecture Redefined
Revisiting Postmodernism
Revolution
Small Practice and the Sole Practitioner
Social Housing
Starting a Practice
Sustainability
Sustainable Building Conservation
Targeting Zero
The Art of Building a Garden City
The BIM Management Handbook
The Design Companion for Planning and Placemaking
The Re-Use Atlas
This is Temporary
Town Planning
Urban Lighting for People
Wellbeing in Interiors
What Colour is your Building?
Wheelchair Housing Design Guide
ZEDlife

Books added to the Library by students in SAPL (Semester One 2019/20)

We have a service called “Books on Time” for students. This allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Books on Time

In Semester One, academic year 2019/2020 we bought the following items after requests from students in SAPL.

There were 132 requests from 55 students totalling £4859.98 (33% from Undergraduate, 23% from Postgraduate taught and 25% from Postgraduate Research)

Title Now in stock
R 128 by Werner Sobek: Bauen im 21. Jahrhundert, architecture in the 21st century 1xlong
A History of Future Cities 1xlong
A History of Metallography 1xlong
Al Manakh 2: Export Gulf (vol 23) 1xlong
Al Manakh: Dubai Guide, Gulf Survey (vol 12) 1xlong
An Architectural Model 1xlong
An Atlas of Geographical Wonders 1xlong
Angels and wild things : the archetypal poetics of Maurice Sendak 1xlong
Architectural Model Building 1xlong
Architectural Tiles: Conservation and Restoration 1xlong
Architecture Interruptus 2xlong
Architetti-pittori e pittori-architetti 1xlong
Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet 1xlong
Autogeddon 1xlong
Automatic for the City Designing for People in the Age of the Driverless Car 1xlong, 1xebook
Between Dystopia and Utopia 1xlong
Biomimetics for Architecture: Learning from Nature 1xlong
Breaking Ground: Architecture by Women 1xlong
Caldecott & Co. notes on books & pictures 1xlong
Calton Hill: And the plans for Edinburgh’s Third New Town 1xlong
Carlo Scarpa: the complete works 2xlong
Cartographies of the absolute 1xlong
Cities, Words and Images 1xlong
Constant: New Babylon 1xlong
Cosmos of Light: the sacred architecture of Le Corbusier 1xlong
Country 1xlong
Creating Nationality in Central Europe, 1880-1950 1xebook
Cultural Identity and Urban Change in Southeast Asia: Interpretative Essays 1xlong
Democracy in Modern Iran: Islam, Culture, and Political Change 1xlong
Design Process in Architecture: From Concept to Completion 1xlong
Designing research for publication 1xlong
Drawing support: murals in the North of Ireland 1xlong
Drone: Object Lessons 1xlong
Dubai, the City as Corporation 29/11/2019
Dubai: Behind an Urban Spectacle 1xlong, 1xebook
Edinburgh 1xlong
Edinburgh: Mapping the City 1xlong
Experimental Architecture: Designing the Unknown 2xlong
Facing Gaia 3xlong
Fitzgerald: Geography of a Revolution (Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation) 1xlong
Fossil Capital: The Rise of Steam-Power and the Roots of Global Warming 1xlong
From Meetinghouse to Megachurch: A Material and Cultural History 1xlong
From What Is to What If: Unleashing the Power of Imagination to Create the Future We Want 1xlong
Greening modernism: preservation, sustainability, and the modern movement 1xlong
Gross ideas: tales of tomorrow’s architecture 1xlong
Hanoi: City of the Rising Dragon 1xlong
Health and Comfort in House Building 1xlong
Hearing Beethoven: A Story of Musical Loss and Discovery 1xlong
Hello World: How to be Human in the Age of the Machine – Signed Special Edition 1xlong
Hipster Christianity: When Church and Cool Collide 1xlong
How to Fix Your Academic Writing Trouble A practical guide 1xlong
Hungry City: how good shapes our lives 2xlong
Hungry Planet 1xlong
Hybrid Urbanism: On the Identity Discourse and the Built Environment 1xlong
Illegal Architect 1xlong
Imagined Futures Fictional Expectations and Capitalist Dynamics 1xlong
Industrial heritage re-tooled: the TICCIH guide 1xlong
Inside Picture Books 1xlong
interact or die 1xlong
Kumbh Mela: Mapping the Ephemeral Mega City 1xlong
Lace not Lace: Contemporary Fiber Art from Lacemaking Techniques 1xlong
Landscape, Race and Memory: Material Ecologies of Citizenship 1xlong
Leeds: Shaping the City 1xlong
Lifeblood: Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital 1xlong
Living with Buildings: And Walking with Ghosts 1xlong
Lo-TEK, Design by Radical Indigenism 1xlong
Lucy Skaer 1xlong
Marginality and exclusion in Egypt 1xlong
Material Imagination in Architecture 1xebook
Me, Me, Me: The Search for Community in Post-war England 1xlong
Meat Market: Female flesh under Capitalism 1xlong
Migrant City (Routledge Advances in Ethnography) 1xlong
Model Making: Conceive, Create and Convince 1xlong
Moravia Manifesto 1xlong
New Frontiers of Architecture: Dubai Between Vision and Reality 1xlong
Non-places 14xlong
Notes on the Ventilation and Warming of Houses, Churches, Schools, and Other Buildings 1xlong
O&O Baukunst: View of the interior 1xlong
Performing Remains: Art and War in Times of Theatrical Re-enactment: On Performing Remains 1xlong
Pleasure: the architecture and design of Rockwell group 1xlong
Plunder of the commons 1xlong
Preserving the world’s great cities 1xlong
Productive Postmodernism: Consuming Histories and Cultural Studies 1xebook
Reading Architecture: Literary Imagination and Architectural Experience 1xlong
Replications: Archaeology, Art History, Psychoanalysis 1xlong
Resilience and Ageing Creativity, Culture and Community 1xlong
Retail Apocalypse: The Death of Malls, Retailers & Jobs 1xlong
Retail Therapy: Why the Retail Industry is Broken – and What Can be Done to Fix It 1xlong
Rossville Flats: The Rise and Fall 1xlong
sand To Silicon: Achieving Rapid Growth Lessons from Dubai 1xlong
Soft City: Building Density for Everyday Life 1xlong
Sport, leisure and culture in the postmodern city 1xlong
Temporary Cities: Resisting Transience in Arabia (Planning, History and Environment Series) 1xlong
The architectural tourist: architectural impressions of Europe 1xlong
The Architectural Tourist: Part 2 (RIAS) 1xlong
The Architecture School Survival Guide 1xlong
The Art of Maurice Sendak 1xlong
The Biophilia Hypothesis 1xebook
The Building Regulations: Explained and Illustrated 1xlong
The Case for Subtle Ar(t)chitecture 1xlong
The Chief Secretary: Augustine Birrell in Ireland 1xlong
The Fungi / 3rd edition 1xebook
The Future of Fashion: Understanding Sustainability in the Fashion Industry 1xlong
The Memory Palace: A Book of Lost Interiors 1xlong
The Mental and the Material 1xlong
The Narrator’s Voice: Dilemma of Children’s Fiction 1xlong
The New Town of Edinburgh: An Architectural Celebration 1xlong
The Picturesque 1xlong
The politics of design in French colonial urbanism 1xlong
The Right to the Smart City 1xlong, 1xebook
The Routledge Companion to Picture-books 1xlong
The Rule of the Land: Walking Ireland’s Border Book 1xlong
The secret block for a secret person in Ireland 1xlong
The Smart City in a Digital World 1xebook
The Tenement Handbook: A Practical Guide 1xlong
The Town Below the Ground: Edinburgh’s Legendary City 1xlong
The Urban Moment: Cosmopolitan Essays on the Late 20th Century City 1xlong
Timespace and International Migration 1xlong
Tokyo 1xlong
Traducción y traductología introducción a la traductología 1xlong
Trash Culture: Objects and Obsolescence in Cultural Perspective 1xlong
UAE and the Gulf: Architecture and Urbanism Now 1xlong
Vancouverism 1xlong
Vexed Texts: How Children’s Picture Books Promote Illiteracy 1xlong
Wardrobe Crisis: How We Went from Sunday Best to Fast Fashion 1xlong
Ways of the Illustrator 1xlong
Whale and the Reactor 1xlong
Why are we the Good Guys? 1xlong
Why Fashion Matters 1xlong
Why look at plants? 1xlong
Why We Can’t Afford the Rich 1xlong
Would you kill the fat man? The trolley problem and what your answer 1xebook