New resource on trial: Rolling Stone Archive

The Library has trial access to the archive of Rolling Stone magazine until November 30th 2021. This gives access to the complete archive of this famous music magazine from its first issue in 1967 to the present.

From its launch, it became an important publication for rock and popular music journalism, closely identified with 1960s–70s counter-culture. From the 1980s, its coverage expanded to encompass further entertainment topics, such as film and television, making it a great resource for contemporary reporting and reviews.

You can search it in various ways (e.g. by topic or author) or browse individual issues page by page.

Rolling Stone issue browse

The trial ends on November 30th 2021. To help us evaluate it, please email us your feedback, or leave a reply on this blog.

Construction Industry Service – new platform

If you’re a user of a database called Construction Industry Service (CIS) then you might notice that our access to the platform is slightly different.

IHS Markit have recently moved this particular sub database to a new hosting site which has a slightly different way to access it. You will now need to set up a free account and password before you can search the platform. Hopefully this is obvious from the note we’ve added to record on our catalogue, Library Search.

We’ve also made a short video which shows you how to set up an account.

Available at : https://campus.recap.ncl.ac.uk/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=7c23df93-e89b-4297-8342-adbb00db0176

The new platform/layout has options along the top and on the left to browse by subject or publishers, there are A-Z lists to navigate through or quick links straight into Eurocodes, regulations and other handbooks.

Please let the Social Sciences Liaison Team know if there’s anything on the new platform you need help with.

Find UK and international news with Nexis Uni

If you’re looking for UK or international news from the last thirty years or so to today, then make sure you explore Nexis. The Nexis database has recently moved to a new platform (Nexis Uni): we think you’ll find it is easier to search than the old version, and it has some really useful features.

If you’re used to ‘old’ Nexis, don’t worry: the content on Nexis Uni is exactly the same, and you can still use the ‘expert’ search features if you want to.

What does it cover?

Nexis Uni enables you to search over 17,000 news, business and legal sources. This includes most UK national and regional newspapers, together with international sources, including newspapers, newswires and news magazines in multiple languages. Coverage of news titles often dates back to the 1990s and includes today’s news. Coverage is text only, and doesn’t include images, layout, adverts etc.

Nexis Uni also gives access to specialist business information, including dossiers on major UK and international companies, together with specialist legal information.

How to search news on Nexis Uni?

There are various ways to limit your search to newspapers/news sources, but the simplest is to select the News button from the Guided Search section:

Guided Search

Type in your search term (use ” ” if searching for a phrase), select your date range, and click Search.

Limit by location of publication

Once your results are displayed, you can then further limit your search by date, publication type, location, language and more.

If you want to search news from a particular country, such as the UK, select Location by Publication >International> and then choose your continent and country.

If you would like to try more complex searching (e.g. searching in a particular section of the newspaper, or combining terms together in various ways), then click on Advanced search from the home page.

There is more detailed guidance about searching in the Nexis help centre.

Searching/browsing a particular newspaper

If you want to find a particular newspaper, choose Menu>All Sources, and then type in the newspaper’s name. Click the three dot menu to get more information about coverage of the newspaper in Nexis Uni (NB ignore the phrase which says Archived source: no longer updated).

You can also use this route to add one or more newspapers as search filters, if you just want to search across certain titles only.

Personalisation features

If you’re using Nexis Uni regularly, we’d recommend you create a Nexis account, which enables you to set up alerts (click the bell icon at the top of your results listing), save searches, annotate and bookmark items, and share these with others. You can read more about alerts here.

Alert button

Please note: if you had previously set up alerts or saved searches on ‘old’ Nexis, they won’t migrate to Nexis Uni, so you’ll need to set them up again.

Where can I get more help?

Click the large question mark icon at the bottom right of the screen to get to the Nexis Help Centre >Support Resources, which includes videos and short guides.

Should I use Lexis or Nexis for UK news searching?

The ‘news’ section on the Lexis legal database enables you to search UK national and regional (but not international) newspapers. Nexis Uni is produced by the same company, and should have the same UK news coverage as Lexis, though Nexis Uni also includes a wider range of news sources such as broadcast news and news wires. We also think you’ll find the Nexis search and personalisation options are better, and easier to use, so we’d recommend Nexis. However, you might prefer to stick with Lexis if you use it regularly for legal information.

Drama Online: new collections for autumn 2021

The Library has recently added several new collections to its Drama Online portfolio. We now have access to over 3,000 playtexts, books and filmed productions via the Drama Online platform.

The latest collections added are:

  • Core Collection Update 2021: 70 playtexts from various publishers
  • Nick Hern Books 2020/2021: 30 playtexts
  • Oberon Books: 501 playtexts, including modern classics, contemporary plays, and international plays in translation.
  • Shakespeare’s Globe 2: films of nine landmark productions from the Globe Theatre’s most recent seasons (complementing our existing access to 21 plays from the Globe 1 collection)

All the films and playtexts are individually catalogued and searchable via Library Search, or you can search/browse them all in various ways on the Drama Online site.

Browsing options

For example, using the Explore or Browse options at the top of the screen, you can browse by title, playwright, genre and time period, or if you click Advanced Play Search on the home page, you can use other search filters, such as number of roles, word count, gender etc. Select Context and Criticism for access to a wide range of e-books about drama.

When viewing a playtext, click Play Tools to analyse the speaking parts and appearances of different characters throughout the play.

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Play Tools

New resource now available: Mass Observation 1980s and 1990s

We’re delighted to announce that the Library has now bought the latest instalment of the Mass Observation Online collection, covering the 1980s and 1990s.

About Mass Observation

Mass Observation is a pioneering project which documents the social history of Britain by recruiting volunteers (‘observers’) to write about their lives, experiences and opinions. Still growing, it is one of the most important sources available for qualitative social data in the UK. This latest instalment is a great resource for anyone researching aspects of late twentieth century Britain. It complements our existing access to the original Mass Observation project archive, which covers 1937-1967.

1981-1999 collection

The 1980s and 1990s modules include hundreds of directive (survey) responses from observers on a wide range of issues, covering major political and social themes of the period from Thatcher to Blair, as well as everyday life. There are also photographs, leaflets, and other ephemeral materials, as well as contextual essays and timelines to help you interpret the collection.

Searching and browsing

Filtering options

You can browse or search Mass Observation in various ways.

Browse by directive: browse the different directives (surveys), which are arranged chronologically and by topic.

Browse all documents: browse all the individual documents, and then further filter your search as required.

You can also use the Advanced search box at the top of the screen to search for specific topics.

Help

Research tools

We’d recommend you start by reading through the Introduction (top menu) which explains more about the project and the different document types. If you’re looking for ideas about how to make use of it, take a look at the Research Tools, which includes essays, videos, exhibitions and chronological timelines.

Note that as over half the materials in these collections are handwritten, the database enables Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) to help you search. We would recommend you read about how HTR works, to help you get the best out of the database, in the Introduction section.

New resource now available: Bloomsbury Popular Music

We are pleased to announce that the Library has bought access to Bloomsbury Popular Music (soon to be renamed Bloomsbury Music and Sound), following a well-received trial. This wide-ranging resource comprises:

  • All twelve volumes of the landmark reference work, Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World.
  • All 170 short books in the 33 1/3 series, focusing on significant LPs from a wide range of genres and eras.
  • A selection of over 100 scholarly ebooks on popular music published by Bloomsbury, including biographies and historical overviews.
  • Interactive features, including a pop music timeline back to 1900 and world map.
  • Biographies of hundreds of artists.
  • Personalisation features to help you cite, share, search and collaborate.

You can search or browse it in various ways, such as by artist, genre or location. All books included in Bloomsbury Popular Music are also individually catalogued on Library Search, and new content is added twice a year.

Watch the short trailer for an overview, and enjoy exploring, from Cab Calloway to Cabaret Voltaire and beyond!

Resource in Focus: Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals

The platform is created by the Getty Research Institute and is a comprehensive guide to current literature of architecture and design.

It contains the bibliographic data of over 2500 journals and publications from professional associations. So it’s perfect if you’ve got a topic, some keywords, a building name or architect or material. It also provides over 13,000 citation records for architects’ obituaries

This is a major resource for the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape.

This 4 minute video covers logging in, searching and filtering your results.

Resource in Focus: Bloomsbury Architecture Library

We’ve decided we like this platform so much we have created a short 4 minute video highlighting it’s key features, how to access and search.

On the platform you can choose to search or browse by theme or use interactive features such as the visual timeline and world map. The timeline puts the world’s key buildings and architectural history in perspective. It provides context for movements, themes and periods throughout 5,500 years of history.

Users can click on the images to discover more, with links through to the Building Pages and in-depth reading via reference articles and book chapters.

The resource contains Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture 21st edition. This covers 5,500 years of architecture right up to the present day. From abacus to ziyada, the Sir Banister Fletcher Glossary contains over 900 key architectural terms, clearly explained and defined. The glossary covers a complete range of technical, design, and historical terms, including non-English language vocabulary, and serves both as a core reference resource and an invaluable primer to enhancing the reader’s understanding of global architectural history.

There are descriptions of major buildings together with 2,200 photographs, drawings and building plans.

The platforms also contains 42 eBooks.

We like this resource as there’s no Digital Rights Management, you can create your own log in to bookmark or save content and there are lots of options to search so easy if you’re looking for geographical information or from a specific date range or keyword or topic or person.

Access to Bloomsbury Architectural Library via our catalogue.

Resource in Focus: Architects Journal Buildings Database

The AJ Buildings Library is a digital database that showcases more than 1,900 exemplar projects, most from the last 20 years but including major projects back to 1900.

This is a core resource for the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape.


You can search for projects by age, cost, architect, building type, footprint, location, and a combination of these.

We like it as each project featured includes full project data (more than 20 items of information) and comprehensive architectural photographs and drawings (plans, elevation, section) – all provided at high resolution.

This 3 minute video covers:

  • How to set up an account on the AJ website so that you can access Buildings
  • How to access and log in
  • How to search

To access for free you will need to set up an account first.

Quick instructions (or watch the video above)

  • Access https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/ and click on the Log in/Register.
  • Then click on the Register New Account button, and you should see a form to complete your details and choose a password.
  • You should receive an email indicating you have registered.
  • Then access  https://www.ajbuildingslibrary.co.uk
  • Click Sign in and use the details from the AJ to access AJ Buildings Library.

Resource in Focus: The Listener Archive

The Library has access to The Listener Historical Archive for its entire run from 1929-1991.

The Listener was a weekly magazine established by the BBC in 1929 under its director-general, Lord Reith. It was initially developed as the medium for reproducing broadcast talks on the radio, but in later years, television as well, and was the intellectual counterpart to the BBC listings magazine, Radio Times. It is one of the few records and means of accessing the content of many early broadcasts, and also regularly reviewed new books.

The Listener developed a reputation for outstanding writing, with contributions from the major writers, artists, commentators and thinkers of the twentieth century, including E.M. Forster, George Orwell and Virginia Woolf. It’s an invaluable resource for those researching the critical reception of culture in the twentieth century, and the response of the public.

You can browse The Listener by date to find a specific issue, or search in various ways (choose Advanced Search to see all options, including searching by section of the magazine, author or date.)

Additional search features on the home page include Term Frequency, to trace how often a word, phrase or person has featured in The Listener over the years, and Topic Finder, to explore and visualise connections between topics.

As the Listener archive is published by the company Gale, you can cross-search it with any of the other Gale archives to which we have access, via Gale Primary Sources.