History and growth of Fake News

Fake News is nothing new and has been going on since time began!

Have at look at our timeline on our Fake News Guide for a snapshot of how Fake News has shaped history:

With the introduction of mass news with the invention of the printing press, and the massive up-rise in news being created and fed via social media, the growth of the term ‘Fake News’ and the actual production of Fake News stories has grown exponentially in recent years:

  • The term ‘Fake News’ is searched for in web browsers 70.8-118 thousand times a month.
  • #fakenews has over 251.2k mentions on Twitter
  • In 2017 Donald Trump mentioned the term ‘Fake News’ in public correspondence, 320 times!

Not only has the volume of Fake News grown, but also the speed that it spreads.  However, maybe there is a way we can slow it down:

Read our other blogs on Fake News to be aware of the consequences of Fake News and how you can become a Fake News Ninja.

References
Kiely, E. (2018) Trump’s Phony ‘Fake News’ Claims. Available at: https://www.factcheck.org/2018/01/trumps-phony-fake-news-claims/. Accessed: 23 March 2018).
Smith, R. (2017) The Numbers Behind Fake News. Available at: http://www.dailyinfographic.com/numbers-behind-fake-news. (Accessed: 23 March 2018).

Spotlight on Ovid

Ovid enables researchers, clinicians, students and other healthcare professionals find medical information to make critical decision, improve patient care, enhance ongoing research, and fuel new discoveries.  The Ovid platform gives access to a collection of databases.

Database and Coverage:

Click on the database name above to go to the Fact file to find out more and to see whether they would be useful for your research.

Where can you find Ovid?

You can navigate to Ovid from the Databases link under the Subject Support section from the Library homepage.

Library homepage with database link highlighted

Or you can find the links to the individual databases under the Journals and Databases tab in your Subject Guide.

Medical subject library guide screenshot with OVID databases highlighted

Database Guides
Once you have accessed OVID through the above methods, you will see an initial selection window. To find out more about  a specific resource, click on the Information icon at the right hand side of the page (see example below):

Screenshot of the Ovid list of databases. Need to click on the information button next to each database to find out more. Once you have decided on which database to search within OVID, then all you need to do is to tick the box next to the database you would like to search and then select ‘OK’.

Want to know more?
Each database in OVID has different subject headings and thesauri, however there are tips and tricks that you can learn that are common to searching all the databases on OVID.  So why not check out the Advanced Searching Techniques or watch this short video showing you how to search? And keep your eyes peeled for future blogs on the individual Ovid databases.

Where to find theses and dissertations?

Many of you are busy writing your dissertation right now, in the depths of your Masters project or wrestling with your PhD. If you are looking for ideas then look no further than our Theses and Dissertations Guide.

There are many reasons why you would use other theses and dissertations for your studies:

  • Has anyone else done a thesis or dissertation on my topic? If so…
    • How similar is it to my research question? Do I need to change my question slightly?
    • What references/citations did they use? Check them out, they might have used some good references that can help you.
    • Can you use this theses/dissertation as a reference for your research?
  • Inspiration! Maybe you have a vague idea what your research question is, but you want to see what’s been done already.

Our Theses and Dissertations Guide tells you what print and electronic theses NU Library holds, where to find international theses and signposts you to further information on theses/dissertation production.

 

How to find images you can use?

The Images topic guide gives you plenty of help with how to find images and how you can use them in a responsible manner – being aware of Copyright laws and how to reference your images.

Remember to use the tabs to discover more on where to find moving images for your studies and further advice on using these resources.

Also check out Lucy’s blog post on using images.

To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk. – Thomas Edison

If invention is the name of your game, have a look at out Patent Guide.  Though it is small it is very mighty… explaining what Patents are, where to get help in Newcastle, links to online databases where you can search for patents and other online resources for further information on Patents.

*Please note, patents can be quite tricky to search for , so for further help we recommend that you attend one of Newcastle City Library’s FREE Intellectual Property surgeries.

 

Roll up, roll up…..

Need to access Business news?….or what about finding TV / audio newsreels? Or alternatively, what about a historic 17th century newspaper article? Our Newspaper Guide directs you to key resources for current, historic, business and international news. Take our 3 minute tour (see video below) to find out more.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_jorLzTXTQ&feature=youtu.be

Fancy yourself as the next Sherlock?

What comes into your head, when someone says ‘maps’? I think we often presume that if we aren’t studying geography, earth sciences, archaeology or architecture for instance then they aren’t for us. But think again! Maps can be applied to a variety of different ways in research and we have put together a Maps topic guide to explain what resources we have and potentially how they can be used.

The Maps guide outlines the different ways you can access both physical and online maps and gives you an overview of how you can use our online Digimap ROAM subscription.  With this tool, you can not only get up to date OS Maps, but also historic maps which can help track both infrastructure development, as well as social and environmental changes too. And if you want to directly compare different aged maps against each other, Digimap lets you toggle between the two on your screen.

Thematic maps and a database of case studies to see how Digimaps have been applied to research can also be found on the Maps guide. Here is just a taster to whet your appetite:

  • Mapping the victims of Jack the Ripper using Historic Roam
  • Conducting a national fox survey using Environment Roam
  • Studying garden history and landscape in the 18th Century
  • Designing housing in Byker for an Artists in Residence project.

So…..before you rule out maps as not relevant for your research, why not take a minute and have a look at our Maps guide  to see if there is potentially something for you!

N.B. If you’re wanting to be the next Sherlock, just remember you need to plan your investigations in advance and register with Digimap at least 24 hours before you need to start using the resource.

Taking a road trip and need to find this week’s petrol prices?

Statistics…..legislation…..government bills….these often aren’t the type of things which get us jumping up and down with excitement and if we do need to find information on them it can be a bit daunting to know where to start. Where do I find statistics on this week’s petrol prices?….Where do I find historic proceedings of the Old Bailey? ……Where do I find out information on GDP growth? How can I find European or international case law?……What changes are forecast for the post-referendum UK economy?…… These are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of questions that can underpin vital academic research or help you with a business start up.

But never fear, your trusty librarians are here with our Government Publication Guide. Hurrah I hear you shout!

On the Government Publication Guide you will find a wealth of subscriptions and high quality links to statistical information, legislation, parliamentary publications and international statistics and official publications. So what are you waiting for…….head to the guide and check it out!

Does anyone else think they might have a box set binge problem?

Let’s say you are exploring the export potential for a local beer, finding out which country drinks the most beer per capita is probably a good place to start. Or maybe you’ve designed some beautiful new handbags and you want to find out which country’s women have the highest annual disposable income? Have you ever wondered if you are alone in your box set binge habits? Well good quality market research is what you need.

The Market Research guide introduces the two main sources we have available via the library, Mintel and Passport. The guide introduces each resource, giving you an overview of what you’ll find there, how best to find the information you need and links to lots of useful help, advice and tips.

You’ll also find market research, industry and country profiles in Business Source Complete and Nexis so it’s always worth checking multiple sources.

Market Research Topic Guide homepage image

Want to know more about Mintel and Passport? View our quick introductions on SlideShare.

https://www.slideshare.net/newcastleunilibrary/mintel-academic

https://www.slideshare.net/newcastleunilibrary/market-research-passport-euromonitor-international

 

Ever wondered what Lord Alan Sugar does in his spare time?

Whether you are researching an individual company, a company director, sector or country, company information databases allow you to identify, analyse and compare companies based on their business success or profile. We have a number of resources that have been brought together on the Company Information guide that will help you find

  • data from public and private companies, locally and globally
  • key company profiles including financial data and executives
  • detailed financial analysis data
  • industry and country analysis

Each resource covers slightly different information so for most assignments you’ll need to gather data and evidence from multiple sources. The Company Information guide includes an introduction to what you’ll find in each of the resources linked there, help and guidance.

So if you have every wondered what percentage of the confectionery market in the United Kingdom is chocolate, how many employees Primark has or which supermarket made the biggest profit in 2017, the Company Information guide  will point you in the right direction.