New resource on trial: Country Life archive

Country Life screenshot

The Library has trial access to the archive of the Country Life magazine until March 10th 2022. The archive covers this weekly magazine from 1897 to 2005, giving a unique insight into over a century of British heritage and upper class living, including art, architecture, and landscapes, with an emphasis on leisure pursuits, such as antique collecting, hunting, shooting, equestrian news, and gardening.

It is also an important record of the changing ownership of the United Kingdom’s great houses, sometimes serving as the only source for restoration of early 20th-century structures.

Every page is reproduced in full colour, including all images and advertisements.

You can search or browse Country Life in various ways. If you select Advanced Search, you can use options to limit your search to particular types of content (for example, adverts or photographs).

Country Life advanced search options

For more advice, visit the Country Life lib guide.

The trial ends on March 10th 2022. To help us evaluate it, please email us your feedback, or leave a reply on this blog.

We’re here to help (even when we’re not)

Christmas scene with dining table

The University may be closed for the Christmas period but if you are studying, writing assignments or revising, library resources and help are always available. We may not be in the building, but the library team can help you with your semester 2 preparation.

Use your Library Subject Guide

If you are not sure which resources are best to use for your subject or what you can access off-campus, visit your Subject Guide . The guides bring together links and help for the specialist information sources in your discipline.

Visit the Library over the vacation

The Philip Robinson Library building will be open for the majority of the Winter break (Friday 24th December 2021 – Monday 3rd January 2022) but is closed on Christmas Day (Saturday 25th December) and New Year’s Day (Saturday 1st January). All other library buildings will be closed for the entire Winter break.  If you need access to books and journals, or a quiet place to study, all you will need is to book your study space online and to bring your University smartcard to enter the building. Visit the website for the Library vacation opening hours. Please remember that it is currently mandatory to wear a face covering when moving around indoors in all university buildings (free masks are available at the Library Welcome Desk).

Have a question? Check the FAQs

We have an extensive database of frequently asked questions available on the Library website. You can search by keyword or browse by topic area and find answers to the most common questions. So whether you want to know how to access newspapers from the Library, how to book study space or get help with EndNote, check the FAQs to see if we have already answered your question.

Contact Library Help

If you need help or have a question, use Library Help to get in touch with us. You can live chat with a librarian outside of the University to get immediate answers, or send us a message and we will get back to you when the University reopens.

So remember, you can access all of our online resources, journals and e-books from the Library website and we will be back in the Library on Tuesday 4th January 2022. Enjoy the festive season!

Construction Industry Service – new platform

If you’re a user of a database called Construction Industry Service (CIS) then you might notice that our access to the platform is slightly different.

IHS Markit have recently moved this particular sub database to a new hosting site which has a slightly different way to access it. You will now need to set up a free account and password before you can search the platform. Hopefully this is obvious from the note we’ve added to record on our catalogue, Library Search.

We’ve also made a short video which shows you how to set up an account.

Available at : https://campus.recap.ncl.ac.uk/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=7c23df93-e89b-4297-8342-adbb00db0176

The new platform/layout has options along the top and on the left to browse by subject or publishers, there are A-Z lists to navigate through or quick links straight into Eurocodes, regulations and other handbooks.

Please let the Social Sciences Liaison Team know if there’s anything on the new platform you need help with.

New e-book collections: Bloomsbury and Manchester University Press

We have bought several new e-book collections from Bloomsbury and Manchester University Press, complementing and updating our existing collections from these two publishers.

From Bloomsbury, we have bought new collections in:

architecture

arts and visual culture

classical studies and archaeology

education

history

linguistics

music and sound

politics and international relations

These new modules give us just under 500 new titles in total.


From Manchester University Press, we have bought the latest collections in:

political studies

history of medicine

film and media studies

These give us 136 new titles in total.

All the titles are individually catalogued on Library Search, or if you prefer, you can browse them from the publishers’ platforms via the links above. NB If you are browsing any of the Bloomsbury subject collections, under Access, tick Purchased/Open Access.

Sustainable development goals online

This platform from Taylor and Francis is directly mapped onto the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

The Sustainable Development Goals Online collection contains more than 12,000 of the most important book chapters and journal articles published under Routledge and CRC Press.

We like the variety of content on the platform from essays, presentations, videos, articles and chapters.

From a teaching point of view, academics will want to check out the teaching and learning resources, teaching guides and lesson plans.

The collection was brought together to help governments, NGOs and organisation respond to the UN call to action and we think it will be of benefit to both teaching and research at the University.

Additional information can be found on the Sustainable Goals website or watch the short video below

Reading Lists and supporting your students

Teaching is just around the corner and the students are starting to prepare for studying through 2021/22. So, which resources are you going to recommend to your students to support your teaching? How will you ensure the Library can offer access to what you need?

We’re promoting the Reading Lists service to our students. It’s easy to use, accessible and is a good starting point when approaching a new subject area.

Surprisingly, even in 2021, not every book is available online. You can use Reading Lists to check to see if we, as an institution, can gain access to those essential, recommended and background reading materials for you and your students. 

How can you do this? Well, you can self-enrol on the Reading Lists Training for Staff course which is available via Canvas. It will explain each stage of creating and editing your lists ready for your students to use for guidance and to prioritise their reading.

An image of the Reading Lists Training for Staff Canvas course home page.

If you don’t have time to do this now, you can produce a list of books, book chapters, journal articles and other resources and submit this to our dedicated Library Reading Lists team to create the online version to be accessed via Canvas for you. If you are doing this, the team need to know:

  • Module Leader or Coordinator’s name.
  • School.
  • Reading list/Module title.
  • Module code.
  • Anticipated student numbers on module (if known).
  • When it is running, e.g. Semester One and/or Two.

You should think about how the list should be organised: by topic, lecture, seminar, etc.

Finally, each item should be classified as essential, recommended or background reading so the Library is aware of the potential demand on the materials.

If you have any questions about availability of online materials or the Reading Lists service, contact your Liaison Team.

Resource in Focus: Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals

The platform is created by the Getty Research Institute and is a comprehensive guide to current literature of architecture and design.

It contains the bibliographic data of over 2500 journals and publications from professional associations. So it’s perfect if you’ve got a topic, some keywords, a building name or architect or material. It also provides over 13,000 citation records for architects’ obituaries

This is a major resource for the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape.

This 4 minute video covers logging in, searching and filtering your results.

Resource in Focus: Bloomsbury Architecture Library

We’ve decided we like this platform so much we have created a short 4 minute video highlighting it’s key features, how to access and search.

On the platform you can choose to search or browse by theme or use interactive features such as the visual timeline and world map. The timeline puts the world’s key buildings and architectural history in perspective. It provides context for movements, themes and periods throughout 5,500 years of history.

Users can click on the images to discover more, with links through to the Building Pages and in-depth reading via reference articles and book chapters.

The resource contains Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture 21st edition. This covers 5,500 years of architecture right up to the present day. From abacus to ziyada, the Sir Banister Fletcher Glossary contains over 900 key architectural terms, clearly explained and defined. The glossary covers a complete range of technical, design, and historical terms, including non-English language vocabulary, and serves both as a core reference resource and an invaluable primer to enhancing the reader’s understanding of global architectural history.

There are descriptions of major buildings together with 2,200 photographs, drawings and building plans.

The platforms also contains 42 eBooks.

We like this resource as there’s no Digital Rights Management, you can create your own log in to bookmark or save content and there are lots of options to search so easy if you’re looking for geographical information or from a specific date range or keyword or topic or person.

Access to Bloomsbury Architectural Library via our catalogue.

Resource in Focus: Architects Journal Buildings Database

The AJ Buildings Library is a digital database that showcases more than 1,900 exemplar projects, most from the last 20 years but including major projects back to 1900.

This is a core resource for the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape.


You can search for projects by age, cost, architect, building type, footprint, location, and a combination of these.

We like it as each project featured includes full project data (more than 20 items of information) and comprehensive architectural photographs and drawings (plans, elevation, section) – all provided at high resolution.

This 3 minute video covers:

  • How to set up an account on the AJ website so that you can access Buildings
  • How to access and log in
  • How to search

To access for free you will need to set up an account first.

Quick instructions (or watch the video above)

  • Access https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/ and click on the Log in/Register.
  • Then click on the Register New Account button, and you should see a form to complete your details and choose a password.
  • You should receive an email indicating you have registered.
  • Then access  https://www.ajbuildingslibrary.co.uk
  • Click Sign in and use the details from the AJ to access AJ Buildings Library.

Books added to the Library by students in SAPL (Semester Two 2020/21)

Our Recommend a Book service for students allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Recommend a book.

In Semester Two, academic year 2020/2021 we received 83 requests from students (38 PGR, 23 PGT and 22 UGT) in SAPL. This is what we bought :

[Un]Grounding Post-Foundational GeographiesBook – Electronic
A history of children’s play and play environments: Toward a contemporary child saving movementBook – Electronic
Abolish Silicon Valley: How to Liberate Technology from CapitalismBook – Physical
Anti-Social Behaviour in Britain: Victorian and Contemporary PerspectivesBook – Electronic
Authoritarian Liberalism and the Transformation of Modern EuropeBook – Electronic
Capital in the Twenty-First CenturyBook – Electronic
Design Science: Introduction to the Needs, Scope and Organization of Engineering Design KnowledgeBook – Physical
Difficult Heritage’ in Nation BuildingBook – Electronic
Elite MobilitiesBook – Electronic
Empire and Righteous Nation: 600 Years of China-Korea RelationsBook – Electronic
Gender, Sexuality, and Space CultureBook – Electronic
Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the WorldBook – Physical
Ghost Road Beyond the Driverless CarBook – Physical
Hello, StrangerBook – Electronic
How To Talk To Robots: A Girls’ Guide To a Future Dominated by AIBook – Physical
Hyperconnectivity and digital reality : towards the eutopia of beingBook – Electronic
Intergenerational Mobilities: Relationality, age and lifecourseBook – Electronic
Livable StreetsBook – Electronic
Phenomenology of Values and ValuingBook – Electronic
Prototyping ArchitectureBook – Physical
Risk Governance Coping with Uncertainty in a Complex WorldBook – Electronic
Ruin memories : materialities, aesthetics and the archaeology of the recent pastBook – Electronic
Shapers of Urban Form: Explorations in Morphological AgencyBook – Electronic
Skateboarding and the City:A Complete HistoryBook – Electronic
Space, Imagination and the Cosmos from Antiquity to the Early Modern PeriodBook – Electronic
The Art of Experiment: Post-pandemic Knowledge Practices for 21st Century Architecture and DesignBook – Electronic
The Biopolitics of Water: Governance, Scarcity and PopulationsBook – Electronic
The everyday experiences of reconstruction and regeneration: from vision to reality in Birmingham and CoventryBook – Electronic
The Limits to Scarcity: Contesting the Politics of AllocationBook – Electronic
The Right to Water: Politics, Governance and Social StrugglesBook – Electronic
Toward an Anthropological Theory of Value: The False Coin of Our Own DreamsBook – Electronic
Tropical Modernity: life and work of C.P. Wolff SchoemakerBook – Physical
Under a White Sky The Nature of the FutureBook – Physical
Urban Futures Planning for City Foresight and City VisionsBook – Electronic
Water Ethics: A Values Approach to Solving the Water Crisis (second edition)Book – Electronic
Water Politics: Governance, Justice and the Right to WaterBook – Electronic
What Is Water? The History of a Modern AbstractionBook – Electronic
What Water Is Worth: Overlooked Non-Economic Value in Water ResourcesBook – Electronic
After urban regeneration: communities, policy and place.Book – Electronic
Architect’s Legal Pocket Book / 3rdBook – Physical
Beyond successful and active ageing : a theory of model ageingBook – Electronic
Brain Storm: The Flaws in the Science of Sex DifferencesBook – Electronic
Building with Reclaimed Components and Materials: A Design Handbook for Reuse and RecyclingBook – Electronic
Designing and conducting mixed methods research / 3rdBook – Physical
Designing for the homelessBook – Physical
Designing with Smell: Practices, Techniques and ChallengesBook – Electronic
Enhancing Disaster Preparedness From Humanitarian Architecture to Community ResilienceBook – Electronic
Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of SightBook – Electronic
Islands of Abandonment: Life in the Post-Human LandscapeBook – Electronic
Letters from the Earth: Uncensored WritingsBook – Physical
Marx, Capital and the Madness of Economic ReasonBook – Electronic
Multiform: Architecture in an Age of Transition (Architectural Design)Book – Physical
Naturalistic Planting Design The Essential Guide: How to Design High-Impact, Low-Input GardensBook – Physical
Rural Regeneration in the UKBook – Electronic
Small Change: About the Art of Practice and the Limits of Planning in CitiesBook – Electronic
Structural Design for the StageBook – Electronic
The Craft and Art of Scenic Design: Strategies, Concepts, and ResourcesBook – Physical
The Designer’s Atlas of SustainabilityBook – Electronic
The Ideal City: Exploring Urban FuturesBook – Physical
Ways of Looking: How to Experience Contemporary ArtBook – Physical
Broadlands and the New Rurality: An EthnographyBook – Electronic
Architectural Design and RegulationBook – Electronic
Architecture of Resistance: Cultivating Moments of Possibility within the Palestinian/Israeli Conflict (Design Research in Architecture) 1st EditionBook – Electronic
Broken Cities: Inside the Global Housing CrisisBook – Electronic
Concrete Changes: Architecture, Politics, and the Design of Boston City HallBook – Electronic
Digital Participation and Collaboration in Architectural DesignBook – Electronic
Eileen Gray: Her Work and Her WorldBook – Electronic
Eleven exercises in the art of architectural drawing : slow-food for the architect’s imaginationBook – Electronic
England’s Co-operative Movement: An Architectural HistoryBook – Electronic
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Dana-Thomas House: The Illustrated Story of an Architectural MasterpieceBook – Physical
Handbook of Global Urban Health Routledge Book – Electronic
Heritage, Conservation and Communities: Engagement, participation and capacity buildingBook – Electronic
History of CastlefordBook – Physical
Las Vegas in Singapore: Violence, Progress and the Crisis of Nationalist ModernityBook – Electronic
Living in Digital Worlds: Designing the Digital Public SpaceBook – Electronic
Mixed communities: Gentrification by stealth?Book – Electronic
Rethinking Policy and Politics Reflections on Contemporary Debates in Policy StudiesBook – Electronic
The Emergence of the Interior: Architecture, Modernity, DomesticityBook – Electronic
The Imperial Museums of Meiji JapanBook – Physical
The Peregrine Faclon / 2ndBook – Electronic
The Urban Commons: How Data and Technology Can Rebuild Our CommunitiesBook – Electronic
Think like an ArchitectBook – Electronic
This building should have some sort of distinctive shapeBook – Physical