Resource Trial – Faculti Platform

Faculti is a media library of up to date academic and professional research insights. It is cross disciplinary and includes insights from The United Nations, UK Parliament, Bank of England and many other academic and research institutions worldwide.
It includes useful Leading Figures, Most Cited and Explainers categories as well as the ability to browse specific subject areas or do a keyword search.
Our free trial lasts until 10th November 2022.

Faculti platform

The platform is compatible with any desktop computer or mobile device.

If you’re on campus then access the platform here

If you’re off campus you’ll need to authenticate in a different way so click on access via this link

The trial ends on 11th November 2022. To help us evaluate it, please email us your feedback, or leave a reply on this blog.

New resource now available: Mass Observation 2000s

We’re pleased to announce that we have now added the latest 2000s module to the very popular Mass Observation Online resource. We already had access to the 1980s and 1990s modules.

About Mass Observation

Mass Observation is a pioneering project which documents the social history of Britain by recruiting volunteers (‘observers’) to write about their lives, experiences and opinions. Still growing, it is one of the most important sources available for qualitative social data in the UK. This latest instalment is a great resource for anyone researching aspects of the early 21st century. It complements our existing access to the original Mass Observation project archive, which covers 1937-1967.

2000s collection

This module has a strong emphasis on technological advancements and the changing means of communication that came with the new Millennium. Highlights include the Millennium Diaries, the events of September 11th and environmental concerns, as well as detailing the everyday lives, thoughts, and opinions of respondents.

Searching and browsing

Screenshot of filtering options
Filtering options

You can browse or search Mass Observation in various ways.

Browse by directive: browse the different directives (surveys), which are arranged chronologically and by topic.

Browse all documents: browse all the individual documents, and then further filter your search as required.

You can also use the Advanced search box at the top of the screen to search for specific topics.

Help

Screenshot of research tools
Research tools

We’d recommend you start by reading through the Introduction (top menu) which explains more about the project and the different document types. If you’re looking for ideas about how to make use of it, take a look at the Research Tools, which includes essays, videos, exhibitions and chronological timelines.

Note that as over half the materials in these collections (mainly the pre-2000s modules) are handwritten, the database enables Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) to help you search. We would recommend you read about how HTR works, to help you get the best out of the database, in the Introduction section.

Books added to the Library by students in SAPL (Semester Two 2021/22)

Our Recommend a Book service for students allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Recommend a book.

In Semester Two, academic year 2021/2022 we successfully processed 42 requests from 32 students ( 15 PGR, 7 PGT and 10 UGT) in SAPL totalling just over £2800.

A history of design institutes in China : from Mao to market
A Post State-Centric Analysis of China-Africa Relations : Internationalisation of Chinese Capital and State-Society Relations in Ethiopia
Applications of Advanced Green Materials
Architecture Competitions Yearbook 2021
Autonorama: The illustory promise of high-tech driving
Building Colonial Hong Kong Speculative Development and Segregation in the City
Building for Industry
Building Iran Modernism: Architecture, and National Heritage Under the Pahlavi Monarchs (Arab studies journal/ vol 20 issue 1)
Can the Subaltern speak?
Collage Architecture
Companion to Public Space
Computer Architectures: Constructing the Common Ground
Constructing a place of critical architecture in China : intermediate criticality in the journal Time + architecture
Down Detour Road: An Architect in Search of Practice
Dream Play Build: Hands-On Community Engagement for Enduring Spaces and Places
Egalia’s Daughters
Healthy Cities? Design for Well-Being
How to Live in a Flat
Learning from Shenzhen: China’s Post-Mao Experiment from Special Zone to Model City
Minding Bodies; How Physical Space, Sensation, and Movement Affect Learning
No place to go: how public toilets fails our private needs
Non-Extractive Architecture: Volume 1 – On Designing without Depletion
Prostitution and the Ends of Empire Scale, Governmentalities, and Interwar India
Raising Global Families
Revolutionary Bodies Technologies of Gender, Sex, and Self in Contemporary Iran
Rhetoric: Essays in Invention and Discovery
Routledge Handbook of Interpretive Political Science
Spaces of Colonialism: Delhi’s Urban Governmentalities
Sunderland on behalf of living, history North East
Technical Studies, tectonic explorations : notional considerations in developing a tectonic dissertation
The Freedom to Be Free
The New Autonomous House: Design and Planning for Sustainability
The Philip Johnson Glass House: An Architect in The Garden
The Private Rented Housing Market Regulation or Deregulation?
The Routledge Handbook of Institutions and Planning in Action
The Speculative City: Emergent Forms and Norms of the Built Environment
Undesign: Critical Practices at the Intersection of Art and Design
Vegetarian Architecture: Case Studies on Building and Nature
Which Contract: Choosing the Appropriate Building Contract / 6th
Who Owns the Past?: Archaeological Heritage between Idealism and Destruction (Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology)
Women [Re]Build: Stories, Polemics, Futures
Women and Public Space in Turkey: Gender, Modernity and the Urban Experience

Finding empirical and methodological research articles

When it comes to research methods or research methodologies, there can be a lot of unfamiliar terms and concepts to get to grips with. One question we’re often asked by masters business students is how to find empirical and methodological research articles. It’s a good question as it can be quite tricky to locate articles on these topics, so here’s some advice on how you can go about searching for them in Library Search and the databases that we subscribe to.

Book shelves with hanging light bulbs
Photo by 🇸🇮 Janko Ferlič on Unsplash

What is the difference between empirical and methodological research?

Let’s start by defining our key terms, so we know what to look out for:

Empirical research

Empirical research is based on observed and measured phenomena and derives knowledge from actual experience rather than from theory or belief.

How do you know if a study is empirical? Read the subheadings within the article, book, or report and look for a description of the research methodology. Ask yourself: Could I recreate this study and test these results?

Key characteristics to look for:

  • Specific research questions to be answered
  • Definition of the population, behaviour, or phenomena being studied
  • Description of the process used to study this population or phenomena, including selection criteria, controls, and testing instruments (such as surveys)

Another hint: some scholarly journals use a specific layout, called the “IMRaD” format, to communicate empirical research findings. Such articles typically have 4 components:

  • Introduction: sometimes called “literature review” — what is currently known about the topic — usually includes a theoretical framework and/or discussion of previous studies
  • Methodology: sometimes called “research design” — how to recreate the study — usually describes the population, research process, and analytical tools
  • Results: sometimes called “findings” — what was learned through the study — usually appears as statistical data or as substantial quotations from research participants
  • Discussion: sometimes called “conclusion” or “implications” — why the study is important — usually describes how the research results influence professional practices or future studies

Thank you to Penn State University for their description of empirical research: https://guides.libraries.psu.edu/emp

Methodological research / study

According to Mbaugbaw et al., a methodological study will:

“…evaluate the design, analysis or reporting of other research-related reports […] They help to highlight issues in the conduct of research with the aim of improving […] research methodology, and ultimately reducing research waste (2020, p.1).

In simple terms, it’s research on research!

Key characteristics to look for:

  • Will have the term ‘methodological research’ or ‘methodological study’ in the title or abstract.
  • Has more of a focus on the method(s) employed to do the research (e.g. interviews, questionnaires) rather than the findings of the research.
  • Evaluates how research was done and how the methodology could be improved.

How to find empirical and methodological research articles in Library Search and databases

Finding these research articles isn’t always easy, but it can be done! While they are indexed in most databases, it can sometimes be tricky to find them because of the wide variety of names used for these type of studies (methodological research can also be known as research-on-research, meta-research, meta-epidemiological studies etc.). Here’s our top tips for finding empirical and methodological research articles:

Searching via journal titles

The easiest way to find these journal articles is to target journals that are focused on research methods, then search or browse within those titles.

Here’s some examples of such journal titles to help you find methodological studies:

I recommend that you search for these titles in Library Search under ‘Everything except articles’ filter:

Screenshot of Library Search and searching for a particular Journal title.

Within these titles I recommend searching for “methodological study” in the abstract:

Screen shot of searching within SAGE Journals for "methodological study"

To find empirical research articles, you would go to top, peer-reviewed, research journals in your field of study (the list is endless!) and search within these using relevant keywords.

Here are some key journal titles in the field of business:

You then need to search within these journal titles, ideally within the abstract, for keywords relating to the research design / method ( i.e. how the researcher collected their empirical research) So you might search for terms such as interview*, survey*, questionnaire*, “focus group*” or “mixed method*” :

Screen shot of searching within a business journal for an empirical research method

Searching via keyword in Library Search and databases

If you aren’t finding enough when searching within journal titles, broaden your search by looking within Library Search and other suitable databases.

The Advanced Search within Library Search is a good place to start. Again, try to search for keywords such as “methodological study”, or by method, e.g., interview*, survey*, questionnaire*, “focus group*” or “mixed method*”, along with your subject topic. Remember to use the filters if you need to find research within a particular time frame, such as the last 10 years and to change the drop down to search “everything”.

Screenshot of Library Search search for "methodological study"

If you are looking within Scopus or subject specialist databases, such as Business Source Complete, the process is exactly the same. If your search isn’t working, try different keywords, but persevere as the research is there, it just might be hiding:

Screenshot of Scopus showing searching "methodological study" within the Abstract field.

Searching with controlled vocabulary / subject headings

Some of our databases use controlled vocabulary (a thesaurus), this allows you to identify the preferred terms used in a particular database for your topic of interest, making it easier to find relevant articles. Here is a worked example using controlled vocabulary in Business Source Complete:

I tried a search for “empirical research”, and found it is a preferred term within this database:

Clicking on this preferred term allows you to explore any related or narrower terms, which you can choose to add to your search to improve the quality of your results:

Screenshot of thesaurus in Business Source complete

I decided to add Empirical research and the related term Quantitative research to my search, clicking add to include them in my search string:

I can then add subject related terms to my search:

Many of the social sciences databases have a thesaurus that you can search within.

SAGE Research Methods

For further help on topic of research methods and methodologies, check out SAGE Research Methods. This is a database containing thousands of resources, dedicated to the subject area of Research Methods. It supports all stages of the research process including: writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing the best research methods, analysing data, to writing up your results and thinking about publication. It contains information suited to all levels of researchers, from undergraduates starting your first project to research associates. Within the resource, you can access dictionary and encyclopaedia entries, book chapters, full books, journal articles, case studies, some datasets and video. There are many uses for the resources you will find in SAGE Research Methods:

  • get a quick explanation of a term or concept in a dictionary or encyclopaedia entry
  • access a full overview of a qualitative and quantitative methods, theory or approach in a specialist book
  • use an e-book chapter that covers a specific method in more detail for your methodology chapter or when choosing how to approach your research
  • access a journal article that illustrates the real world application of the methods in research

Access the SAGE Research Methods User Guide for an overview of the resource, and use the tabs below to access videos and training materials to get started. 

To access SAGE Research Methods, either:

I hope you have found this useful. I’m sorry there isn’t an easy way for finding such articles, however, a thorough and systematic search within journal titles, Library Search and databases will allow you to find some relevant and good quality articles that you can use in your research.

If you need further help with this topic or something similar, please make an appointment with your Liaison Librarian.

References

Mbuagbaw, L., Lawson, D. O., Puljak, L., Allison, D. B. and Thabane, L. (2020) ‘A tutorial on methodological studies: the what, when, how and why’, BMC Medical Research Methodology, 20(1). Available at: https://bmcmedresmethodol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12874-020-01107-7 (Accessed: 15 June 2022).

3 places to look for images for Architecture, Planning & Landscape

We know students and researchers in SAPL use images for all sorts of reasons. You might know some websites which provide some good pictures or maybe you just Google to find some. But for academic work you’ll want to ensure they are good quality, you can reference them correctly and they adhere to any Copyright terms and conditions.

You can use some of the resources from the Library to look for pictures of buildings, plans, projects and architectural photographs.

This help video covers the 3 main places we’d advise you look.

https://web.microsoftstream.com/video/2713acc4-e8ec-4f3c-8052-15602a5bbed

Detail Inspiration and it’s 3000 projects spanning over 30 years.

Architects Journal Buildings Library and its 1900 projects spanning the last 20 years.

Art and Architecture Archive; a full text archive of magazines including Architects Journal and Architectural Review.

These articles have been indexed so that you can specifically search for images and photographs.

Books added to the Library by students in SAPL (Semester One 2021/22)

Our Recommend a Book service for students allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Recommend a book.

In Semester One, academic year 2021/2022 we successfully processed 126 requests from 44 students (14 PGR, 13 PGT and 17 UGT) in SAPL, totalling just over £7,500. This is what we bought :

Alden B. Dow: Midwestern Modern
Applied urban ecology: a global framework
Architects and Firms: A Sociological Perspective on Architectural Practice
Architecture and its interpretation: A study of expressive systems in architecture
Architecture of Modern China
Building A Revolution: Chinese Architecture Since 1980
Building Materials: Material Theory and the Architectural Specification
Circular Cities: A revolution in urban sustainability
Climate Change Denial: Heads in the Sand
Contemplating Historical Consciousness: Notes from the Field
Crime, Bodies and Space Towards an Ethical Approach to Urban Policies in the Information Age
Cultures @ Silicon Valley
Dark Ecology:For a Logic of Future Coexistence
Design Anthropology: Theory and Practice
Design as Politics
Design with Scrap
Design, control, predict Logistical Governance in the Smart City
Designing Smart Objects in Everyday Life: Intelligences, Agencies, Ecologies
Designs on History The Architect as Physical Historian
Development Through Bricolage: Rethinking Institutions for Natural Resource Management
Digital Participatory Planning: Citizen Engagement, Democracy, and Design (print and ebook requested)
Dreamstreets: A Journey Through Britain’s Village Utopias
El mito de la cruzada de Franco/The Myth of Franco’s Crusade
Exploring Strategy, Text and Cases
Feminist Practices Interdisciplinary Approaches to Women in Architecture
Formgiving
Fragments of the City Making and Remaking Urban Worlds
GO BIG: How To Fix Our World
Handbook of Tyranny
Heritage at the Interface: Interpretation and Identity
Hybrid Modernities: Architecture and Representation at the 1931 Colonial Exposition, Paris
Jürgen Habermas
Kulturpalast Dresden
La cruzada de 1936 / The Crusade of 1936: Mito y memoria / Myth and Memory
Living in motion : design and architecture for flexible dwelling
Lost Lines: North Eastern
Managing Construction Projects: an information processing approach / 2nd
Managing the Professional Practice in the Built Environment
Managing the Professional Service Firm
Man’s War Against Nature: Penguin Green Ideas
Marx’s Ecology: Materialism and nature
Memories & Mementoes of Sunderland Through Time
More mobile : portable architecture for today
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Narrative Architecture: A Kynical Manifesto
New Directions in Radical Cartography
New Portable Architecture: Designing Mobile & Temporary Structures
Nomadic Homes. Architecture on the move
Nomadic living : relocatable residences
Norman Foster: Works 4
North Eastern Branch Lines Past and Present
On the Political
On the Pragmatics of Social Interaction
Once upon a china
Paint Your Town Red: How Preston Took Back Control and Your Town Can Too
Paris primitive: Jaques Chirac’s museum on the Quai Branly
People and Culture in Construction
Play in animal and humans
Railscenes Around Sunderland
Railway Stations of the North East
Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World
Reading by the Colors: Overcoming Dyslexia and Other Reading Disabilities Through the Irlen Method
Reflections: Building the new MFA
Regional Cultures, Economies, and Creativity Innovating Through Place in Australia and Beyond
Regional Tramways: Yorkshire and North East of England
Rethinking Global Modernism Architectural Historiography and the Postcolonial
Riders on the Storm: The Climate Crisis and the Survival of Being
Routledge International Handbook of Green Criminology/2nd Ed
Ruins and Fragments: Tales of Loss and Rediscovery
Secret Sunderland
See inside All Art is Ecological
Sergei Tchoban: Architecture Drawings
Sergei Tchoban: Lines and Volumes: Encounters with the Architect, Artist, Collector and Museum Founder
Sibyl Moholy-Nagy
Slaughterhouse: Chicago’s Union Stock Yard and the World It Made
Social Urbanism and the Politics of Violence: The Medellín Miracle
Social Urbanism Reframing Spatial Design through our Collective Culture Reframing Spatial Design Discourses from Latin America
Social Value in Construction
St.Peter’s Riverside Sculpture Project: A Long Term Artist in Residence Scheme in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear
Steam and Speed: Railways of Tyne and Wear from the Earliest Days
Strayed Homes: Cultural Histories of the Domestic in Public.
Structural Packaging: Design your own Boxes and 3D Forms
Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream
Such Places as Memory: Poems 1953-1996
Sunderland : building a city
Sunderland in 50 Buildings
Sunderland in old photographs
Sunderland Through Time
Sunderland, Industrial Giant: Recollections of Working Life
Talking and Writing
The Architecture of ruins : designs on the past, present and future
The Architecture of Sunderland
The civic city in a nomadic world
The Future of the Corpse: Changing Ecologies of Death and Disposition
The Historiography of Persian Architecture
The history of the town and port of Sunderland, and the parishes of Bishopwearmouth and Monkwearmouth
The Hubble Legacy: 30 Years of Discoveries and Images
The Misguided Search for the Political
The new nomads : temporary spaces and a life on the move
The Production of Heritage The Politicisation of Architectural Conservation
The Return of Inequality Social Change and the Weight of the Past
The Re-Use of Urban Ruins Atmospheric Inquiries of the City
The Routledge Companion to Games in Architecture and Urban Planning
The Routledge Companion to Women in Architecture
The Scope of Total Architecture
The Secret Life of the Modern House: The Evolution of the Way We Live Now
The Siege Of The Alcazar
The Songyang Story: Architectural Acupuncture as Driver for Rural Revitalisation in China
The Sunderland Cottage: A History of Wearside’s ‘Little Palaces’
The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy
The Wood Age: How one material shaped the whole of human history
The World We Once Lived In
Theoretical anxiety and design strategies : in the work of eight contemporary architects
Things We Could Design For More Than Human-Centered Worlds
This Can’t Be Happening
This Is Not Normal The Collapse of Liberal Britain
Tomorrow’s Timber: Towards the next building revolution
Too Blessed to be Depressed – Crimson Architectural Historians 1994 – 2001
Unbuilt Radical Visions of a Future That Never Arrived
Urban Informalities Reflections on the Formal and Informal
Urban Wildscapes
Water: A Biography
WiMBY! Hoogvilet: The Future, Past and Present of a Satellite Town
Women architects in the modern movement
Women’s Places Architecture and Design 1860-1960

We’re here to help (even when we’re not)

Christmas scene with dining table

The University may be closed for the Christmas period but if you are studying, writing assignments or revising, library resources and help are always available. We may not be in the building, but the library team can help you with your semester 2 preparation.

Use your Library Subject Guide

If you are not sure which resources are best to use for your subject or what you can access off-campus, visit your Subject Guide . The guides bring together links and help for the specialist information sources in your discipline.

Visit the Library over the vacation

The Philip Robinson Library building will be open for the majority of the Winter break (Friday 24th December 2021 – Monday 3rd January 2022) but is closed on Christmas Day (Saturday 25th December) and New Year’s Day (Saturday 1st January). All other library buildings will be closed for the entire Winter break.  If you need access to books and journals, or a quiet place to study, all you will need is to book your study space online and to bring your University smartcard to enter the building. Visit the website for the Library vacation opening hours. Please remember that it is currently mandatory to wear a face covering when moving around indoors in all university buildings (free masks are available at the Library Welcome Desk).

Have a question? Check the FAQs

We have an extensive database of frequently asked questions available on the Library website. You can search by keyword or browse by topic area and find answers to the most common questions. So whether you want to know how to access newspapers from the Library, how to book study space or get help with EndNote, check the FAQs to see if we have already answered your question.

Contact Library Help

If you need help or have a question, use Library Help to get in touch with us. You can live chat with a librarian outside of the University to get immediate answers, or send us a message and we will get back to you when the University reopens.

So remember, you can access all of our online resources, journals and e-books from the Library website and we will be back in the Library on Tuesday 4th January 2022. Enjoy the festive season!

New e-book collections: Bloomsbury and Manchester University Press

We have bought several new e-book collections from Bloomsbury and Manchester University Press, complementing and updating our existing collections from these two publishers.

From Bloomsbury, we have bought new collections in:

architecture

arts and visual culture

classical studies and archaeology

education

history

linguistics

music and sound

politics and international relations

These new modules give us just under 500 new titles in total.


From Manchester University Press, we have bought the latest collections in:

political studies

history of medicine

film and media studies

These give us 136 new titles in total.

All the titles are individually catalogued on Library Search, or if you prefer, you can browse them from the publishers’ platforms via the links above. NB If you are browsing any of the Bloomsbury subject collections, under Access, tick Purchased/Open Access.

Sustainable development goals online

This platform from Taylor and Francis is directly mapped onto the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

The Sustainable Development Goals Online collection contains more than 12,000 of the most important book chapters and journal articles published under Routledge and CRC Press.

We like the variety of content on the platform from essays, presentations, videos, articles and chapters.

From a teaching point of view, academics will want to check out the teaching and learning resources, teaching guides and lesson plans.

The collection was brought together to help governments, NGOs and organisation respond to the UN call to action and we think it will be of benefit to both teaching and research at the University.

Additional information can be found on the Sustainable Goals website or watch the short video below

Reading Lists and supporting your students

Teaching is just around the corner and the students are starting to prepare for studying through 2021/22. So, which resources are you going to recommend to your students to support your teaching? How will you ensure the Library can offer access to what you need?

We’re promoting the Reading Lists service to our students. It’s easy to use, accessible and is a good starting point when approaching a new subject area.

Surprisingly, even in 2021, not every book is available online. You can use Reading Lists to check to see if we, as an institution, can gain access to those essential, recommended and background reading materials for you and your students. 

How can you do this? Well, you can self-enrol on the Reading Lists Training for Staff course which is available via Canvas. It will explain each stage of creating and editing your lists ready for your students to use for guidance and to prioritise their reading.

An image of the Reading Lists Training for Staff Canvas course home page.

If you don’t have time to do this now, you can produce a list of books, book chapters, journal articles and other resources and submit this to our dedicated Library Reading Lists team to create the online version to be accessed via Canvas for you. If you are doing this, the team need to know:

  • Module Leader or Coordinator’s name.
  • School.
  • Reading list/Module title.
  • Module code.
  • Anticipated student numbers on module (if known).
  • When it is running, e.g. Semester One and/or Two.

You should think about how the list should be organised: by topic, lecture, seminar, etc.

Finally, each item should be classified as essential, recommended or background reading so the Library is aware of the potential demand on the materials.

If you have any questions about availability of online materials or the Reading Lists service, contact your Liaison Team.