Free research relating to COVID-19 and infectious diseases

Many publishers have started to make their research publications relating to COVID-19, infectious diseases and immunology free-to-read to support the scientific community.

You can find a selection to start your research here:

BioOne
In collaboration with the Association of Research Libraries, BioOne is offering peer-reviewed content from its publishing partners throughout 2020.

CABI Global Health
Free access for 3 months using the voucher code in the pop-up message which appears when you open the site. Content includes research on epidemiology, prevention and control of SARS and MERS. Content about animal coronaviruses from its CAB Abstracts database is available through the same route, for research into the origins of the virus in animals.

Digital Science – Dimensions
Updated every 24 hours, access this Google doc for a hyperlinked listing of the latest research publications, datasets and clinical trials. An Excel file version is also available on Figshare.

EDP Sciences
Journal content from 2018-2020 is free-to-read until the end of June 2020 – covering physics & astronomy, engineering & technology, health sciences & dentistry, life sciences, chemistry, mathematics and computer sciences. Exceptions include journals EDP do not own, only host, and any content published with a partner who has not yet given permission. Browse and search EDP Sciences.

Elsevier
Free health and medical research from Elsevier’s Novel Coronavirus Information Center.

OVID
Tools and resources for clinicians including the latest from the OVID platform, expert search strategies and guidance on searching GIDEON (Global Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Online Network) effectively.

Oxford University Press
Journal articles from OUP and book chapters from Oxford Medicine Online collections.

Royal Society Publishing
Open access special collection of research articles, review articles and reports.

SAGE publishing
Free medical, social and behavioural science articles.

Springer Nature
Research, evidence and data from the BMC, Nature and Springer platforms.

Taylor and Francis
Microsite consolidating journal and book content on COVID 19 with further links to NLM’s LitCOVID portal and the F1000 Research dedicated gateway containing pre-prints for faster research dissemination and sharing.

Thieme
Specialist journal articles, including content from Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Wiley
Open access research articles, book chapters and entries from major reference works on the Wiley platform.

For help and advice on finding information relating to your research, please contact your Liaison Librarian as we remain available to support you remotely.

Now available: Cambridge University Press announces free electronic textbooks collection until end May 2020

Cambridge University Press has made over 700 textbooks freely available to those in Higher Education until the end of May 2020 as a result of COVID-19.

These titles are in addition to our current CUP holdings and we are adding them to Library Search to aid discovery.

To browse and access the free collections visit the Cambridge Textbooks homepage (including subject headings): https://www.cambridge.org/core/what-we-publish/textbooks

For more information see the Cambridge COVID-19 resource notification page: https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/covid-19-resources-and-information

We are here to help (even when you’re working off campus)

As the University monitors the situation around the spread of Covid-19 (Coronavirus), the Library is working to ensure that you have access to the resources and academic skills support you need to continue your studies while off campus. 

The information and links on this page provide guidance on how to engage with our wide range of online materials and how to make the most of our helpful online guides and tools from wherever you choose to study. 

Library Search: your first point of call

Use Library Search to quickly and simply access a wide range of eBooks, eJournals, and databases off campus. Check out our Library Search video on how to get the best out of this resource. 

Subject and Resource Guides

If you are not sure which resources are best to use for your subject or what you can access off-campus, visit your Subject Guide . The guides bring together links and help for the specialist information sources in your discipline. Access our Resource Guides for different types of information you may need in your research. These include guides to business casescompany and market informationgovernment publicationsgrey literaturemapsnewspaperspatentsstandards
statistics,  theses and dissertations, plus much more.  

Develop your skills, at a time that suits you

Use our FindingEvaluating and Managing Information guides to boost your search skills and help you achieve the best results in your assignments whilst working remotely. If you are needing help with academic writing and reading or even numeracy, maths and statistics, then don’t forget their are lots of downloadable resources available at the ASK website.

Dissertation support

If you are in the midst of writing or planning a dissertation then our our Dissertation Guide is a great place to guide you with your literature search.  Not only do we have videos, quizzes and advice, but we also have an interactive Proposal Planner and Search Planner to help you get organised and create a focus for your research.  We can even give you feedback once you’ve filled the planners in. Just send them through when prompted or email them to your supervisor for advice and help.

Have a question? Check the FAQs

We have an extensive database of frequently asked questions available on the Library website. You can search by keyword or browse by topic area and find answers to the most common questions. So whether you want to know how to access newspapers or get help with EndNote, check the FAQs to see if we have already answered your question.

Contact Library Help

If you need help or have a question, use Library Help to get in touch with us. We are still here for you 24/7 and you can chat with us online or email us as normal. You can also keep in touch with us via social media.

So remember, you can access all of our online resources, journals and ebooks from the Library website.

Photo by Allie Smith on Unsplash

Getting the most out of eBooks

Woman reading on an eReader device.

We have over 6 million eBooks accessible through Library Search, including titles that feature on your reading lists, or those that have been recommended by staff and students. Sometimes we buy them through large bundle deals with specific publishers so we gain access to lots of research titles all at once.

Why Use eBooks?

eBooks are incredibly useful resources as they are available 24/7 from any location, work with most devices and some come with snazzy features such as keyword searching, annotation options, links to other relevant information, and reading aloud facilities to name but a few.

How do eBooks Work?

As we get eBooks from different platforms and providers you might see a different layout each time you access one of our titles but the logic is the same. You can navigate using a toolbar, you can normally turn pages using little arrows at the top or side of the page, you can jump to specific chapters and in some cases, print or download all or some sections of the eBook to read offline.

Unfortunately, one thing you can’t do with eBooks is download and save offline a copy of the book to keep forever, there are usually some download restrictions. This is because we have subscriptions or licence access to titles but we don’t own the title. There is something called Digital Rights Management where publishers can control the copying, pasting and downloading of their content, this is linked to issues with privacy and copyright.

How do I access eBooks?

Simply navigate to Library Search and enter your keywords to look for a book title as usual. Library Search is the best way to access resources whether you’re on or off campus as it makes sure you’re logged in correctly and can access resources simply and quickly.

From your search results, choose an eBook which looks relevant e.g. Essentials of Business Research Methods by Hair, which we know is popular book for Business students doing dissertations. If you are off campus, you will need to sign in with your University ID and Password.

Once the eBook has loaded on the screen, hover over the functionality buttons to see what they do. For example; the search option will be useful if you’re looking for specific topics; use the Table of Contents to navigate straight to a chapter you’ve been told to read, or select the paint pallet to change the colour of the background to help with your reading.

Not all titles are available in eBook format for an institutional library to purchase, but if you’d prefer a title in electronic format we can certainly investigate. Just let us know by recommending a title via Books on Time.

Books added to the Library by students in GPS (Semester One 2019/20)

We have a service called “Books on Time” for students. This allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Books on Time

In Semester One, academic year 2019/2020 we bought the following items after requests from students in GPS.

There were 91 requests from 44 students totalling £4249.13 (43% from Undergraduate, 14% from Postgraduate taught and 43% from Postgraduate Research)

Title Now in stock
A Brutal Friendship – The West and the Arab Elite 2xlong
A Research Agenda for Housing 1xlong
Alignment Despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle 1xlong
Animal to Edible 1xlong
Animals, Property and the Law 1xlong
Beautyscapes mapping cosmetic surgery tourism 1xlong, 1xebook
Beyond Gridlock 1xebook
Bloodborne Official Artworks 1xlong
Blur: How to know what’s true in the age of information overload 1xlong
Britannia unchained: global lessons for growth 1xlong
Cameronism: the politics of modernisation and manipulation 1xlong
Cameronism: The Politics of Modernisation and Manipulation 1xlong
China’s Eurasian Pivot: The Silk Road Economic Belt 1xlong
Class Notes Posing as Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene 1xlong
Communication, Public Opinion and Globalization in Urban China 1xlong
Crashing the Party: From the Bernie Sanders Campaign to a Progressive movement 1xlong
Dance of the Dialectic 1xlong
Democracy’s Detectives: The Economics of Investigative Journalism 1xlong
Diverging Mobilities? Devolution, Transport and Policy Innovation. 1xlong
Educational Choices, Transitions and Aspirations in Europe 1xlong
Emotions, Technology, and Health 1xlong
Essays on Economics and Economists 1xlong
Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight 1xlong
Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual for a Sexist workplace 1xlong
Financialising City Statecraft and Infrastructure 3xlong, 1xebook
For Whose Benefit? The Everyday Realities of Welfare Reform 1xlong
Gendered Spaces 1xlong
Geopolitics and the Western Pacific: China, Japan and the US 1xlong
Glacier Science and Environmental Change 1xlong
Global Media Ecologies: Networked Production in Film and Television 1xlong
Governing with the News 1xlong
Happy Abortions 1xlong
Hog Wild: The Battle for Workers\’ Rights at the World\’s Largest Slaughterhouse 1xlong
Holidays in the Danger Zone: Entanglements of War and Tourism 1xlong
Home: international perspectives on culture 1xlong
How the market in changing China’s news 1xlong
Humanitarianism: A Dictionary of Concepts 1xlong
Introduction to Animal Rights: Your Child or the Dog? 1xlong
Justifying New Labour Policy 1xlong
Kant’s International Relations: The Political Theology of Perpetual Peace 1xlong
Land Matters: Power Struggles in Rural Ireland 1xlong
Literary memory, consciousness, and the group oulipo 1xlong
Mad Cowboy: Plain Truth from the Cattle Rancher Who Won’t eat Meat 1xlong
Making a World after Empire: The Bandung Moment and Its Political Afterlives 1xlong
Meatpackers: An Oral History of Black Packinghouse Workers and Their Struggle for Racial and Economic Equality 1xlong
Media Clusters: Spatial Agglomeration and Content Capabilities 1xlong
Mobile Urbanism: Cities and Policymaking in the Global Age 1xlong
Negotiating water governance 1xlong
Neoliberal Housing Policy 1xlong
Networking China: the digital transformation of the Chinese economy 1xlong
On the line: slaughterhouse lives and the making of the new South 1xlong
Opera: dead or alive 1xlong
Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography 1xebook
Parenting Collection 1xlong
Participatory Research in More Than Human Worlds 1xlong
Perpetration-induced Traumatic Stress: The Psychological Consequences of Killing 1xlong
Philosophical Genealogy I: An epistemological reconstruction of Nietzsche and Foucault’s Genealogical Method 1xlong
Political Street Art: Communication, Culture and Resistance in Latin America 1xebook
Proteinaholic 1xlong
Putting Meat on the American Table: Taste, Technology, Transformations 1xlong
Queer Representations: Reading Lives, Reading Cultures 2xlong
Routledge Handbook of Global Environmental Politics 1xlong
Routledge Handbook of the Belt and Road 1xlong
Samsung, Media Empire and Family: A power web 1xlong
Scale-sensitive governance of the environment 1xlong
Securing Paradise: Tourism and Militarism in Hawaii and the Philippines 1xlong
Serious Leisure: A perspective for our time 1xlong
Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America (Case Studies on Contemporary Social Issues) 1xlong
Slaughterhouse: The Shocking Story of Greed, Neglect and Inhumane Treatment Inside the U.S Meat Industry 1xlong
Social work, cats and rocket science: stories of making a difference in social work with adults 1xlong
Sociology of Home: Belonging, Community and Place in the Canadian Context 1xlong
Statelessness and Citizenship: A Comparative Study on the Benefits on Nationality 1xlong
Steppenwolf 1xlong
Still the promised city? African Americans and the new immigrants 1xlong
Submarine Landslides: Subaqueous Mass Transport Deposits from Outcrops to Seismic Profiles 1xebook
Television news and the limits of globalisation 1xlong
The Ashgate Research Companion to Media Geography 1xlong
The ironic spectator: solidarity in the age of post-humanitarianism 1xlong
The mandate of heaven and the great Ming code 1xlong
The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business 1xlong
The Oxford handbook of the American Congress 1xlong
Think tanks in America 1xebook
Think Tanks, Foreign Policy and Geo-Politics Pathways to Influence, 1st Edition 1xlong
Thinking Straight: The Power, Promise and Paradox of Heterosexuality 1xebook
Till: A glacial process sedimentology 1xebook
To the Cloud: Big Data in a Turbulent World 1xlong
Understanding the Business of Global Media in the Digital Age 1xebook
Walking Methods: Research on the Move 1xlong
Welsh Writing, Political Action and Incarceration 1xlong
Who Owns Britain? 1xlong
Women with Intellectual Disabilities: Finding a Place in the World 1xlong

The Research Reserve and Desktop Delivery Service (DDS)

The exterior of the Research Reserve facility in the Team Valley.

The eagle-eyed amongst you may have noticed a curious thing on Library Search. Where normally you would expect to see the name of one of the libraries next to an item’s shelfmark, occasionally you’ll see “Research Reserve”.

If you’ve ever wondered just what exactly the Research Reserve is, this is the blog for you, discover here exactly what the Research Reserve can offer you and your studies.

Before an item’s shelfmark is its location. This book is held off-site at the Research Reserve facility in the Team Valley.

The Research Reserve is the Library’s stores, located throughout campus and including a state-of-the-art storage facility in the Team Valley. These facilities allow the Library to keep less-used material for much longer than other academic libraries. These combined storage facilities provide over 29 kilometres of storage space, which is used to house old editions of journals and books which are consulted infrequently.

If you’d like to request items from the Research Reserve facilities, click the “Request Scan/Borrow” button once you’ve located the item on Library Search.

You can loan a variety of materials from the Research Reserve, including: books, theses and journal volumes. These can be requested from Library Search. Simply log in using your campus ID, find the item you are looking for and then click the blue “Request Scan/Borrow” button. You’ll get a choice of pickup locations (either the Walton or Philip Robinson libraries).

There are request forms to complete if you’d like to borrow a thesis or an entire volume of a journal.

Requests can be viewed by going to “My Account” in Library Search and clicking on “My Requests” from the drop down menu. If you’d like to cancel your request, simply click the blue cancel hyperlink (as seen below). You’ll receive an email confirming your cancellation shortly afterwards.

You can cancel requests for Research Reserve items by clicking the blue ‘Cancel’ hyperlink, as shown above.

There is a collection service that runs between the Research Reserve and the various libraries (weekdays only, not on bank holidays) and your request will be generally be fulfilled within 24 hours. Anything requested on a Friday or over the weekend will be delivered on the following Monday afternoon.

Once your item has arrived at your chosen library, you’ll receive an email letting you know it’s available to loan. The item will be kept on the reservations shelves for five days before being returned to the Team Valley, or passed on to the next person in the reservation queue. Items from the Research Reserve are issued in the same way as standard long loan items, either using the self-issue machines or at the service desk. Once you’ve finished with the item, simply return it as normal.

The Desktop Delivery Service (DDS)

The Desktop Delivery Service can also be reached at: http://dds.ncl.ac.uk

The Desktop Delivery Service (DDS) allows you request a scanned article from a journal held in one of the Library’s stores. Articles can be requested via Library Search (same as a book) or by filling out the relevant request form. Please try and include as much detail as possible on your request form. This helps Library staff locate your article and fulfil your request quicker.

You are only able to request one scanned article per journal issue. The scanned article will be delivered to your University email address, where it can be downloaded and printed off. Requests are generally fulfilled within 24 hours, although this may take longer over the weekends or on bank holidays. You have 30 days to download your article before it is ‘archived’ and no longer available.  

We do not scan items that are available electronically or can be borrowed.

If you have any other queries about the Desktop Delivery Service, read the FAQs.

Just some of the amazing treasures held at the Research Reserve facility in the Team Valley.

You can also visit the off-campus Research Reserve facility in the Team Valley. Daily access is available by appointment only with the Research Reserve team, weekdays between 10AM and 4PM. Access outside of these hours can be organised given sufficient notice. There is a large car park available at the facility and buses stop nearby.

Full contact information, directions and opening hours for the Team Valley facility are available via the Library website.

Resource on trial: SAGE Research Methods

SAGE Research Methods is the ultimate methods library, with more than 1,000 books, reference works, journal articles, and instructional videos by world leading academics from across the social sciences, including the largest collection of qualitative methods books available online from any scholarly publisher.
The resources cover the steps of coming up with a research question, doing a literature review, planning a project, collecting and analyzing data, and writing up a report, dissertation, or thesis, plus detailed information on hundreds of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods.

For student research
• Essential supplementary support for course learning and for students working on dissertations and research projects 
• More than 220,000 pages of content covering hundreds of methodological approaches help students at every step of their project
• Concise author videos answer basic questions like “How do I choose between different research methods?” and “What do you mean by the term ‘ethnography’?”
For faculty research
• Offers critical support in learning new techniques and methods
• Provides crucial resources to help faculty write up their methodology for publication in the best research journals
• Provides in-depth understanding of advanced methods and includes online access to the complete Quantitative Applications in the Social Sciences (QASS) series, also known as “The Little Green Books,” as well as the Qualitative Research Methods Series (QRMS), or “The Little Blue Books”
For teaching research methods
• Serves as the perfect complement to coursework and traditional textbooks in research methods courses for business, communication, criminology, education, health sciences, psychology, political science, social work, and sociology
• Provides sample assignments that help students easily connect to concepts
• Aids faculty who oversee research papers and theses requiring original research


The trial is available until 31st May 2020.

As always, your feedback will be very welcome: you can either email it, or leave a comment on this blogpost.

Access SAGE Research Methods via Library Search.

Resource on trial: SAGE Video Collection

SAGE Video is an easily accessible resource with more than 1,600 hours of streaming video collections in the social sciences, created for use across higher education to support pedagogical needs, for undergraduate teaching and learning through to higher level academic research.

SAGE Video combines originally commissioned and produced material with licensed videos to provide a complete disciplinary resource for students, faculty, and researchers.

It covers the following subject areas:

  • Business & Management
  • Counseling & Psychotherapy
  • Criminology & Criminal Justice
  • Education
  • Leadership
  • Media, Communication & Cultural Studies
  • Politics & International Relations
  • Psychology
  • Sociology

The resource includes:

  • Seminal documentaries on subjects aligned to core curriculum topics
  • Case studies on classic and newly published research 
  • Tutorials illustrating practical applications of methods and concepts
  • Interviews with leading experts on key topics
  • Practitioner demonstrations of theories and techniques
  • Observational footage of practitioners in real-life professional settings
  • Short definitions of key terms and concepts 

To access this resource, click on the link here.

The trial is available until 16th March 2020. As always, your feedback will be very welcome: you can either email it, or leave a comment on this blogpost.

If you are off-campus, please login to RAS first of all, and then access SAGE Video from a browser within RAS.

Are you preparing a dissertation or project, or will be doing so next academic year?

Make sure you visit our interactive dissertation and project guide. Based on the extensive experience of staff from the Library and Writing Development Centre, this guide includes an interactive search planner, which takes you through the different stages of developing your search strategy, and enables you to create and download your personalised search plan: you can even ask for feedback on it from the Library liaison team.

The search planner is complemented by a project proposal planner, developed by our colleagues in the Writing Development Centre, to help you develop or refine your research proposal.

The guide also points you to further advice on a wide range of relevant skills, to give you advanced knowhow in finding, managing and evaluating information. For example: where to find specialised information resources for your subject area; how to access resources beyond our Library; and methods to keep your literature search up to date over a long period.

It’s easy to navigate, with clear text and short videos throughout. We hope you find it helpful, and if you’d like to spare one minute to suggest any changes, we’d really appreciate it!

Resource on trial: Oxford Handbooks Online

The Library has trial access to Oxford Handbooks Online until 3rd March 2020.

This provides access to over 1,000 handbooks, featuring in-depth articles written by experts in their field. The subject coverage is wide-ranging, covering many disciplines in humanities, social sciences and science.

You can access the content in various ways: for example, you can browse by the 17 broad subject areas, to view individual books, and/or the articles within those books.

Browsing by broad subject area

Browsing sub-disciplines

Once in a subject area, you can then refine your search to more specific sub-disciplines.

You can also search in various ways, e.g. by author or keyword.

The handbooks are all individually catalogued and accessible via Library Search during the trial.

We have previously bought access to some of the handbooks, but this trial gives an opportunity to explore the entire collection, featuring a great deal of new content. As always, your feedback will be very welcome: you can either email it, or leave a comment on this blogpost.