Books added to the Library by students in GPS (Semester Two 2021/22)

Our Recommend a Book service for students allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Recommend a book.

In Semester Two, academic year 2021/2022 we successfully processed 100 requests from 30 students ( 19 PGR, 2 PGT and 9 UGT) in GPS totalling nearly £7000.

A Christian Theology of Marriage and Family
A Distant Day / Katsuhiko Hashimoto
A Good Night Out for the Girls: Popular Feminisms in Contemporary Theatre and Performance
Action research in a relational perspective : dialogue, reflexivity, power and ethics
Agonies of Empire: American Power from Clinton to Biden
Any Way You Cut it: Meat Processing and Small-town America
Battered women as survivors: An alternative to treating learned helplessness.
Belfast Diary
British Policy-Making and the Need for a Post-Brexit Policy Style
Budapest Diary
Building communities from the inside out: A Path toward Finding and Mobilizing a Community’s Assets
Cairo Diary
Campaigns of Knowledge
China and International Organizations
China engages global governance: A new world order in the making?
China’s Western Frontier and Eurasia The Politics of State and Region-Building
Chinese Scholars and Foreign Policy Debating International Relations
City Branding: The Ghostly Politics of Representation in Globalising Cities
Cityscapes 1979 – 1985 
Climate change and the governance of corporations : lessons from the retail sector
Coercive Control: Criminology in Focus
Compulsive Body Spaces
Cover image Newcastle West End : Elswick to Newburn
Cultural geographies : an introduction John Horton
David Plowden : vanishing point : fifty years of photography
Digital Play The Interaction of Technology, Culture, and Marketing
Earth Perfect?: Nature, Utopia and the Garden
End of the road
Failing to Protect: The UN and the Politicisation of Human Rights
Fotografien
France(s) territoire liquide : collectif de photographes
From Sacrament to Contract: Marriage, Religion and Law in the Western Tradition
From Women’s Experience to Feminist Theology
Games of Empire Global Capitalism and Video Games
Gas Stop (4 volume set)
Germany’s Hidden Crisis Social Decline in the Heart of Europe
Global Economic Governance and the Development Practices of the Multilateral Development Banks
God, Sex, and Gender: An Introduction
Handbook of Global Contemporary Christianity. Themes and Developments in Culture, Politics, and Society
Handbook of Global Economic Policy
Handbook on the Geographies of Energy
Hate Crimes: Confronting Violence Against Lesbians and Gay Men
Having a Baby
I See a City : Todd Webb’s New York
Improving consensus development for health technology assessment: an international perspective. Institute of Medicine (US) Council on Health Care Technology
Japan and the Politics of Techno-globalism
John Darwell: Sheffield in Transition
Lethal Love: Feminist Literary Readings of Biblical Love Stories
Linz Diary
London 1977-1987
London the Promised Land Revisited: The Changing Face of the London Migrant Landscape in the Early 21st Century
Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the Bible
Materialist Phenomenology : A Philosophy of Perception
Meat, Medicine and Human Health in the Twentieth Century
Medicine, Health and the Public Sphere in Britain, 1600-2000
Memento Mori: the flats at Quarry Hill, Leeds
Migrant Housing: Architecture, Dwelling, Migration
Molecularizing Biology and Medicine
Nagi (The Lull) / Katsuhiko Hashimoto
New American Topographics
Old London: photographed by Henry Dixon and Alfred & John Bool ; for the Society for Photographing Relics of Old London
Osaka Diary
Paysages français : une aventure photographique, 1984-2017
Postcolonial feminist Interpretation of the Bible
Power and Authority in Internet Governance Return of the State?
Qualitative Analysis: Eight approaches for the social sciences
Reconsidering Value and Labour in the Digital Age
Rehabilitation in Practice: Ethnographic Perspectives
Religion Crossing Boundaries transnational Religious and Social Dynamics in Africa and the New African Diaspora
Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy
Revolutionary Horizons: Art and Polemics in 1950s Cuba
Route 66: 1973-1974
Sheffield Photographs, 1988-1992
Songs of Profit, Songs of Loss: Private Equity, Wealth, and Inequality
Surviving Gangs, Violence and Racism in Cape Town
Terror and the Sublime in Art and Critical Theory From Auschwitz to Hiroshima to September 11
The Business of Media Distribution Monetizing Film, TV, and Video Content in an Online World
The Düsseldorf School of photography
The end of industry
The Future of Diplomacy After COVID-19
The Global Architecture of Multilateral Development Banks
The Global Restructuring of the Steel Industry: Innovations, Institutions and Industrial Change
The Globalization of Wine
The Island of Missing Trees
The Landscape of Utopia: Writings on everyday life, taste, democracy and design
The Other Scenery / Katsuhiko Hashimoto
The Political Economy of Industrial Strategy in the UK From Productivity Problems to Development Dilemmas
The Politics of Expertise in China
The Routledge International Handbook on Hate Crime
The transition companion: making your community more resilient in uncertain times
The Work of the UN in Cyprus
The World Bank and Governance A Decade of Reform and Reaction
The World Bank and Social Transformation in International Politics
To Govern the Globe: World Orders and Catastrophic Change
Transformative Pacifism. Critical Theory and Practice
Transforming Masculinities in African Christianity: Gender Controversies in Times of AIDS
Understanding the Presidency
Women, Abuse, and the Bible: How Scripture Can be Used to Hurt Or to Heal
Yangon Diary
Zurich Diary

EDI Summer Reading Challenge

Abstract colourful shapes. Text reads: Summer Reading Challenge, libguides.ncl.ac.uk/edi.

Summer is the perfect time to embark on a journey, broaden your horizons and soak up a different culture or perspective. So, the team behind our Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) library guide is delighted to re-launch a summer EDI reading challenge.

Since its launch in autumn 2020, we’ve been using the guide to curate and highlight print and online resources of all kinds, relating to EDI themes, such as those listed in the University’s EDI priorities. We’ve compiled themed sections and monthly highlights of books, films, social media, archives, podcasts and more, and encouraged suggestions from staff and students across the University to help us develop our collections.

So why not take up our Summer EDI Reading Challenge?

Recommend and Review

Look through our themed reading lists on our Recommended by You & Blog page and explore life through a new lens! We hope you’ll find some inspiration, but we’d also love to receive your recommendations too, and we’ll be highlighting them on the guide.

You’re welcome to use the online form on the lib guide. If you can give us a few words to explain your choice, that would be great! You can see what people recommended last year on our EDI in Literature page.

Social Media

We’ll be running a promotional campaign on social media throughout summer, using the hashtags #ReadingForPleasure and #EDIReadingChallenge. Please look out for these and retweet/repost wherever possible.

Have a great Summer everyone! We’ll leave you with the inspired words of the Poet, Derek Walcott:

I read; I travel; I become.

Finding empirical and methodological research articles

When it comes to research methods or research methodologies, there can be a lot of unfamiliar terms and concepts to get to grips with. One question we’re often asked by masters business students is how to find empirical and methodological research articles. It’s a good question as it can be quite tricky to locate articles on these topics, so here’s some advice on how you can go about searching for them in Library Search and the databases that we subscribe to.

Book shelves with hanging light bulbs
Photo by 🇸🇮 Janko Ferlič on Unsplash

What is the difference between empirical and methodological research?

Let’s start by defining our key terms, so we know what to look out for:

Empirical research

Empirical research is based on observed and measured phenomena and derives knowledge from actual experience rather than from theory or belief.

How do you know if a study is empirical? Read the subheadings within the article, book, or report and look for a description of the research methodology. Ask yourself: Could I recreate this study and test these results?

Key characteristics to look for:

  • Specific research questions to be answered
  • Definition of the population, behaviour, or phenomena being studied
  • Description of the process used to study this population or phenomena, including selection criteria, controls, and testing instruments (such as surveys)

Another hint: some scholarly journals use a specific layout, called the “IMRaD” format, to communicate empirical research findings. Such articles typically have 4 components:

  • Introduction: sometimes called “literature review” — what is currently known about the topic — usually includes a theoretical framework and/or discussion of previous studies
  • Methodology: sometimes called “research design” — how to recreate the study — usually describes the population, research process, and analytical tools
  • Results: sometimes called “findings” — what was learned through the study — usually appears as statistical data or as substantial quotations from research participants
  • Discussion: sometimes called “conclusion” or “implications” — why the study is important — usually describes how the research results influence professional practices or future studies

Thank you to Penn State University for their description of empirical research: https://guides.libraries.psu.edu/emp

Methodological research / study

According to Mbaugbaw et al., a methodological study will:

“…evaluate the design, analysis or reporting of other research-related reports […] They help to highlight issues in the conduct of research with the aim of improving […] research methodology, and ultimately reducing research waste (2020, p.1).

In simple terms, it’s research on research!

Key characteristics to look for:

  • Will have the term ‘methodological research’ or ‘methodological study’ in the title or abstract.
  • Has more of a focus on the method(s) employed to do the research (e.g. interviews, questionnaires) rather than the findings of the research.
  • Evaluates how research was done and how the methodology could be improved.

How to find empirical and methodological research articles in Library Search and databases

Finding these research articles isn’t always easy, but it can be done! While they are indexed in most databases, it can sometimes be tricky to find them because of the wide variety of names used for these type of studies (methodological research can also be known as research-on-research, meta-research, meta-epidemiological studies etc.). Here’s our top tips for finding empirical and methodological research articles:

Searching via journal titles

The easiest way to find these journal articles is to target journals that are focused on research methods, then search or browse within those titles.

Here’s some examples of such journal titles to help you find methodological studies:

I recommend that you search for these titles in Library Search under ‘Everything except articles’ filter:

Screenshot of Library Search and searching for a particular Journal title.

Within these titles I recommend searching for “methodological study” in the abstract:

Screen shot of searching within SAGE Journals for "methodological study"

To find empirical research articles, you would go to top, peer-reviewed, research journals in your field of study (the list is endless!) and search within these using relevant keywords.

Here are some key journal titles in the field of business:

You then need to search within these journal titles, ideally within the abstract, for keywords relating to the research design / method ( i.e. how the researcher collected their empirical research) So you might search for terms such as interview*, survey*, questionnaire*, “focus group*” or “mixed method*” :

Screen shot of searching within a business journal for an empirical research method

Searching via keyword in Library Search and databases

If you aren’t finding enough when searching within journal titles, broaden your search by looking within Library Search and other suitable databases.

The Advanced Search within Library Search is a good place to start. Again, try to search for keywords such as “methodological study”, or by method, e.g., interview*, survey*, questionnaire*, “focus group*” or “mixed method*”, along with your subject topic. Remember to use the filters if you need to find research within a particular time frame, such as the last 10 years:

Screenshot of Library Search search for "methodological study"

If you are looking within Scopus or subject specialist databases, such as Business Source Complete, the process is exactly the same. If your search isn’t working, try different keywords, but persevere as the research is there, it just might be hiding:

Screenshot of Scopus showing searching "methodological study" within the Abstract field.

Searching with controlled vocabulary / subject headings

Some of our databases use controlled vocabulary (a thesaurus), this allows you to identify the preferred terms used in a particular database for your topic of interest, making it easier to find relevant articles. Here is a worked example using controlled vocabulary in Business Source Complete:

I tried a search for “empirical research”, and found it is a preferred term within this database:

Clicking on this preferred term allows you to explore any related or narrower terms, which you can choose to add to your search to improve the quality of your results:

Screenshot of thesaurus in Business Source complete

I decided to add Empirical research and the related term Quantitative research to my search, clicking add to include them in my search string:

I can then add subject related terms to my search:

Many of the social sciences databases have a thesaurus that you can search within.

SAGE Research Methods

For further help on topic of research methods and methodologies, check out SAGE Research Methods. This is a database containing thousands of resources, dedicated to the subject area of Research Methods. It supports all stages of the research process including: writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing the best research methods, analysing data, to writing up your results and thinking about publication. It contains information suited to all levels of researchers, from undergraduates starting your first project to research associates. Within the resource, you can access dictionary and encyclopaedia entries, book chapters, full books, journal articles, case studies, some datasets and video. There are many uses for the resources you will find in SAGE Research Methods:

  • get a quick explanation of a term or concept in a dictionary or encyclopaedia entry
  • access a full overview of a qualitative and quantitative methods, theory or approach in a specialist book
  • use an e-book chapter that covers a specific method in more detail for your methodology chapter or when choosing how to approach your research
  • access a journal article that illustrates the real world application of the methods in research

Access the SAGE Research Methods User Guide for an overview of the resource, and use the tabs below to access videos and training materials to get started. 

To access SAGE Research Methods, either:

I hope you have found this useful. I’m sorry there isn’t an easy way for finding such articles, however, a thorough and systematic search within journal titles, Library Search and databases will allow you to find some relevant and good quality articles that you can use in your research.

If you need further help with this topic or something similar, please make an appointment with your Liaison Librarian.

References

Mbuagbaw, L., Lawson, D. O., Puljak, L., Allison, D. B. and Thabane, L. (2020) ‘A tutorial on methodological studies: the what, when, how and why’, BMC Medical Research Methodology, 20(1). Available at: https://bmcmedresmethodol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12874-020-01107-7 (Accessed: 15 June 2022).

Tackling essay-based exams

Picture of rows of exam desks

Exam season is almost upon us and one challenge you may find yourself facing is revising for essay-based exams. These can cause a lot of anxiety, not least because essay-based assessments are often something we are used to doing over the course of several weeks. How do you plan, structure and write an essay in the space of a couple of hours? And how on earth do you revise when you don’t know what you’ll be asked?

Read on for our guide to effective revision and exam technique for essay-based exam questions:

What are essay exams testing?

Before you jump into your revision, it can be helpful to remember that essay exams are not just testing your memory. Instead, your lecturers are looking for evidence of how well you can apply the knowledge you have gained throughout the course to solve a problem or answer a question under timed conditions. Therefore, whilst memory is still important – you’ll need to be able to recall that knowledge in the exam – it’s only part of the story. You’ll also need to make sure you have an in-depth understanding of that knowledge and have practiced applying it to different questions, problems, and contexts.

How do I revise for essay exams?

You may be tempted to write a ‘generic’ essay on each of the topics you’re revising and memorise them so you can repeat them in the exam room. However, keep in mind that your lecturers are asking you to solve the specific problem they’ve set for you and simply ‘dumping’ everything that’s relevant won’t address the question and is unlikely to earn you good marks.

A more effective approach to revising for essay exams is incorporating strategies that develop your understanding of the topic so you can apply your knowledge to different problems effectively. Some revision strategies you might want to try for this are:

  • Questioning and interrogating the knowledge: why does this happen? How does it happen? Does it always happen this way? Is this always true? What about if we apply it to a different context? What are the implications of this?
  • Try applying the knowledge to case studies or different scenarios to get a better understanding of how theory works in practice.
  • Look at past papers or devise your own questions and either answer them in full or sketch out an essay plan under timed conditions. This will help you to test your recall and practice skills you’ll be using in the exam.
  • Compare and weigh up different approaches to the topic. Does everyone agree on this? Why? Why not? Which perspective is stronger?
  • Identify gaps in your knowledge and do some additional reading to fill them.

What about strategies for the exam itself?

You might be used to spending hours or even days planning, writing, and editing a coursework essay and be wondering how on earth you do all of this under timed conditions. Keep in mind that your lecturers know that this is a big ask and they are not expecting the same level of sophistication in the way you construct your arguments that they would be looking for in a coursework essay. However, it’s still necessary that your lecturers can follow your answer and see clearly how it addresses the question so:

  • Spend some time at the beginning paying attention to what the question is asking you. Our video on question analysis offers some strategies for understanding essay questions:
  • Sketch out a basic structure to follow. This needn’t be more than the main points you want to argue and the order you want to argue them in.
  • Clearly state your point or communicate your main focus at the beginning of each paragraph to help your reader get their bearings and follow your argument.
  • If you find yourself running out of time, write down a few bullet points around your remaining points – you may still pick up a few extra marks for this!

Do I need to reference sources in an essay exam?  

While you won’t be expected to reference others to the extent you do in a coursework essay, it’s worth incorporating a few references to back up your points and show how you worked out your answer.

Try to memorise a couple of key arguments and/or debates made by others for each topic as well as the authors’ surname(s) and the year of the article so that you can cite it in the exam. Don’t worry about the details – just one or two lines summarising their main argument is enough.

What about other types of exams?

Exams exist in various formats in addition to the traditional essay-based exam type. For example, your course may also have multiple choice papers, vivas/oral presentations or exams relating to specific processes, techniques and interactions. All types of exams test your ability to recall and apply your subject knowledge, so most advice on revision and exam technique is applicable to different exam types. Effective revision trains your brain both to retain and to retrieve information; a process that’s equally useful for all exam formats. However, different types of exams can also present different challenges, and transitioning from online to in-person exams is a key change for this year. For more details on this and other exam-related issues, see our ASK Exams Collection and our calendar for upcoming workshops on revision and exam preparation.

We are here to support you!

Don’t forget that the Academic Skills Team will be in the Walton Library to answer questions about exams, revision, and any other questions you may have about academic skills on the following days and times:

11.05.2211:00-13:00
25.05.2211:00-13:00
08.06.2211:00-13:00

Accessing resources beyond the Library

Photograph by Erik Odiin of somebody in a train station
Photo by Erik Odiin on Unsplash

If you’re working on a dissertation, thesis or project right now, or will be doing so next academic year, what can you do if the Library doesn’t have access to all the specialist books and other information resources you need? How can you find out about resources relating to your research topic which are held elsewhere? Can you visit other libraries and archives if you’re away from Newcastle over the vacation?

Read on to find out how you can expand your search beyond our library….

1. Search

You can search across the catalogues of over 170 UK and Irish academic and national libraries, together with other specialist and research libraries, via Library Hub Discover (formerly COPAC). The range of libraries included in Library Hub Discover is expanding all the time, and includes all UK universities, as well as the libraries of such diverse organisations as Durham Cathedral, the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the Royal Horticultural Society.

Library Hub Discover logo

In response to Covid restrictions, Library Hub Discover has also made it easier for you to find Open Access resources via its catalogue: it has recently incorporated the HathiTrust Digital Library, as well as the Directories of Open Access Books and Journals to its searchable database.

For a more in-depth and up-to-date search, you can also search individual academic library catalogues online. Need to look further afield? Search library catalogues internationally via WorldCat.

If you are looking for archives elsewhere, whether in the North East or beyond, our colleagues in the Special Collections and Archives team have compiled a list of useful directories and search tools.

2. Obtain

If we haven’t got the book you want, you can ask us to consider buying or borrowing it via our Recommend a book service.

If you need a copy of a journal article to which we don’t have access, you can apply for it via our inter library loan service, which is currently free.

You can search UK doctoral theses via the national EThOS service. This has records for over 500,000 theses, dating back to the year 1800, of which over half are freely available online (do note you have to register with EThOS before being able to download: it’s a separate login process to your usual University login).

3. Visit

Photo of Special Collections Virtual Reading Room
Special Collections Virtual Reading Room

The SCONUL Access Scheme enables students to visit most other academic libraries around the country, and in some cases, borrow from them. This service has recently resumed since its suspension during the Covid pandemic, but please note that not all academic libraries are currently participating in the scheme, so do check carefully before you visit, and read the latest information on the SCONUL Access site.

You will need to register with SCONUL Access before you can visit another Library, so do allow time for your registration to be processed.

If you want to consult archives or special collections elsewhere, you’ll need to check with the organisation in question beforehand (you’ll usually need to request to consult items in advance of your visit). If you can’t visit in person, archives services may still be able to answer queries, provide access to selected digitised items, or even operate a Virtual Reading Room, so it may well be worth enquiring.

Sound and vision: introducing our new audiovisual resources guide


Where can I find pictures relating to transport which I can use in my project? How do I find out what was broadcast on British television and radio on a particular day in the 1970s? Where are the best places to find examples of digital art? I need audio clips of scary sounds for my presentation – where to start? Are there any interesting oral histories in my subject area? How do I reference a podcast? I’ve found an ideal picture online, but I don’t know where it’s from – what can I do? Is there an authoritative list of famous music plagiarism cases anywhere, including audio clips?

Screenshot of oral histories from the British Library
British Library oral histories selection

You can find the answers to these, and many more intriguing questions, on our brand new guide to finding and using audiovisual resources.

We’ve updated and expanded our old images guide, and included new databases and resources for finding films and television programmes, plus audio content such as radio programmes, sound clips, podcasts and oral histories.

We’ve also updated the original still images section, which helps you find images of all genres and subjects, such as anatomy, archaeology, architecture…. and all other letters of the alphabet!

Need more help?

Keyword searching isn’t always the best way to search for audiovisual content, so if you want to find an image which looks like another one, search by colour, or find exactly what you want on Box of Broadcasts, visit our guide.

Finally, if you’re unsure whether you’re permitted to use an audiovisual resource in your assignment, and/or how to cite it, we can help with that too. Our guide contains plenty of helpful advice on using and citing audiovisual materials, and we’ve tried to include links to collections and databases which are licensed for educational use where possible (but please do check the terms and conditions in each case).

International Women’s Day 2022 – Medicine in Literature

To celebrate International Women’s Day 2022 Walton Library’s Medicine in Literature team have created a Box of Broadcasts watch list to showcase films with a female story at their centre. The selection contains tales about women and their relationships to health, medicine and science. From Frida to Gravity to Suffragette the collection looks at both fictional and non-fictional accounts of the strength it takes to navigate the world as a woman. We hope you enjoy watching!

We are also celebrating International Women’s Day in the Walton Library with a display highlighting the achievements of female graduates from the Faculty of Medical Sciences. These are shown alongside books written by, or about, women who are making an impact in the world of medicine and breaking the gender bias in the process.

Celebrating female graduates of the Faculty of Medical Sciences.

Box of Broadcasts is a TV and radio streaming database that can be accessed via Library Search (UK access only, Login required). Take a look at the list of films selected for International Women’s Day 2022 or browse all of our public playlists by searching ‘Medicine in Literature Newcastle University’.

Is there a book that you think should be on our shelves, or a film to add to a playlist? Is there a subject you think would make a good BoB playlist? Then get in touch.

https://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/medicineinliterature

Get more out of Box of Broadcasts!

Have you met BoB? Box of Broadcasts is a fantastic resource for all subject areas: an archive of over two million radio and television broadcasts from over 75 free-to-air channels, including all BBC channels, ITV and Channel 4, plus some international channels. New programmes are added to BoB as they are broadcast each day.

We know it’s a very popular resource, but are you getting the best out of it? Here are some quick tips for newbies and experienced users alike!

Smarter searching

BoB is a huge database, so searching by keyword may retrieve a lot of irrelevant results, especially as the default search looks for your keyword in all programme transcripts (i.e. every word spoken in a programme). Click on the Search options link just under the search bar to see various ways of making your search more precise, including searching in the programme titles only, or limiting by date. This help video gives more detail:

Playlists and clips

You can create your own playlists: really helpful if you’re researching for an assignment, or preparing to teach a module. You can also search public playlists curated by other BoB users around the UK: just select Public playlists underneath the search bar, or explore this showcase of playlists for more inspiration.

BoB curated playlists

Clips are really easy to make too:

Stop press: pre-2007 broadcasts now available

Box of Broadcasts currently only contains programmes broadcast from 2007 onwards. However, in March 2022, the BBC announced that its entire digitised archive can now be requested using the Television and Radio Index for Teaching and Learning (TRILT), which is also managed by Learning on Screen.

Need more help?

Got more BoB questions? Try their extensive FAQs or take a look at their updated collection of short video guides.

New Resource on Trial; OUP Very Short Introductions

Have you ever needed to dive into a new topic but felt overwhelmed by the amount of research? See if a Very Short Introduction can get you started!

This series offers concise introductions to a diverse range of subjects—from artificial intelligence to folk music to medical ethics—in 35,000 words or less.

Each one of these big little books provides intelligent and serious introductions written by experts who combine facts, analysis, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make even the most challenging topics highly readable.

On our catalogue, Library Search you can search by keywords like in the screenshot below so “very short introduction” and browse through or add in Oxford to add in results for that publisher.

Or visit the OUP Very Short Introductions website directly and then filter using the subject categories. Everything from Medicine, Arts, Humanities, Law, Social Sciences to name but a few.

if you are accessing off campus then once you’re on the OUP site please click “sign in” (on the left hand menu and select Newcastle University from the list to enter your Campus ID and password.)

Oxford University Press have a range of help materials for this collection, so you might want to check out their help video.

The trial ends on April 14th 2022. To help us evaluate it, please email us your feedback, or leave a reply on this blog.

Books added to the Library by students in GPS (Semester One 2021/22)

Our Recommend a Book service for students allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Recommend a book.

In Semester One, academic year 2021/2022 we successfully processed 62 requests from 33 students ( 13 PGR, 6 PGT and 14 UGT) in GPS, totalling just over £4900. This is what we bought :

Adoption, Family and the Paradox of Origins
Australia’s American Constitution and the Dismissal: How English Legal Science Marred the Founders’ Vision
Belonging: a culture of place
Black Feminist Sociology: Perspectives and Praxis (Sociology Re-Wired)
Body and Soul: Notes of an Apprentice Boxer
Bread and Ballot
Building Knowledge: An Architectural History of the University of Edinburgh
China and Eurasia Rethinking Cooperation and Contradictions in the Era of Changing World Order
Constitutional Conventions and the Headship of State: Australian Experience
Contesting Kurdish Identities in Sweden
Dimensions of Dignity at Work
Domestic violence at the margins: Readings in race, class, gender and culture
Ethics of Migration Research Methodology: Dealing with Vulnerable Immigrants
False Summit: Gender in Mountaineering Nonfiction
Framing the Sexual Subject
Gender and mountaineering tourism
Gentrification
Geography of the ‘New’ Education Market: Secondary School Choice in England and Wales
Global Finance: Places, Spaces and People
Global games: Production, circulation and policy in the networked era
Global Governance and Transnationalizing Capitalist Hegemony
Governing Financialization: The Tangled Politics of Financial Liberalization in Britain
Inside the Video Game Industry Game Developers Talk About the Business of Play
Insider Research on Migration and Mobility: International Perspectives on Researcher Positioning (Studies in Migration and Diaspora)
Intersectionality, Class and Migration: Narratives of Iranian Women Migrants in the U.K.
Intersections of Displacement: Refugees’ Experiences of Home and Homelessness
Levelling Up Left Behind Places The Scale and Nature of the Economic and Policy Challenge
Mamma Mia The Movie! Exploring a cultural phenomenon
Managing the White House; an intimate study of the presidency
Material Methods: Researching and Thinking with Things
Media Technologies for Work and Play in East Asia Critical Perspectives on Japan and the Two Koreas
Meta-Geopolitics of Outer Space
Military Strategy as Public Discourse: America’s War in Afghanistan
Planet U : Sustaining the World, Reinventing the University
Platforms and Cultural Production
Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations – New Approaches to Conflict Analysis
Rethinking the Vietnam War
Social support and health
The Ashgate Research Companion to Memory Studies
The Business and Culture of Digital Games
The Constitution of Australia: A Contextual Analysis
The Dismissal: In the Queen’s Name: A Groundbreaking New History
The Film Studio: Film Production in the Global Economy
The Game Production Toolbox
The Intimate Lives of Disabled People
The King and his Dominion Governors
The Kurdish Question in Turkey New Perspectives on Violence, Representation and Reconciliation
The Political Theory of Global Citizenship
The Price of Paradise
The Question of Access: Disability, Space, Meaning
The Social Life of Busyness
The Specter of Global China: politics, labor, and foreign investment in Africa
The Vegan Studies Project: Food, Animals, and Gender in the Age of Terror
The Video Game Industry: Formation, Present State, and Future
Toward a multisited ethnography of the Zimbabwean diaspora in Britain. Identities,
Transcending the Nostalgic: Landscapes of Postindustrial Europe beyond Representation
Vietnam: The Necessary War
Violence against Women of African Descent: Global Perspectives
Vulnerable bodies, gender, the UN and the global refugee crisis
Wartime Shipyard: A Study in Social Disunity
Wilderness Management: Stewardship and Protection of Resources and Values