Books added to the Library by students in SAPL (Semester One 2018/19)

We have a service called “Books on Time” for students. This allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Books on Time

In Semester one, academic year 2018/2019 we bought the following items after requests from students in SAPL.

There were 83 requests from 49 students totaling £4776.41 (22% of requests from undergraduates, 31% from Postgraduate taught and 47% from Postgraduate Research)

 

Title Now in stock
A City is Not a Tree 1xlong
A Greedy Man in a Hungry World 1xlong
A History of Great Yarmouth 1xlong
A Vision of a Living World: The Nature of Order, Book 3 1xlong
Architect in Practice 16xlong, 1xebook
Architecture and Capitalism : 1845 to the Present 1xlong, 1xebook
Architecture as a Craft : Architecture, Drawing, Model and Position 1xlong
Architecture as Experience: Radical Change in Spatial Practice 2xlong
Bananas Reconstructed: Architecture and Sacred Space 1xebook
Building Performance Analysis 1xlong
Century of Fishing: Fishing from Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft, 1899-1999 1xlong
China Development and Governance 1xebook
Cinemetrics : Architectural Drawing Today 1xlong
Cobe – Our Urban Living Room 1xlong
Colour Strategies in Architecture 1xlong
Computing the Environment: Digital Design Tools for Simulation and Visualisation of Sustainable Architecture 1xlong
Critical Companion to Tennessee Williams 1xlong
Culture and customs of Saudi Arabia 1xlong
Cycle Space, Architecture and Urban Design in the Age of the Bicycle 1xlong
Dreamscapes of Modernity: Sociotechnical Imaginaries and the Fabrication of Power 1xlong
Eat, Memory: Great Writers at the Table: A Collection of Essays from the New York Times 1xlong
Experimental Preservation 1xlong
Exploring the Use and Impact of Travel Guidebooks 1xlong
Fiction as Method 1xlong
Fish and Chips: A History 1xlong
Future Matters: Action, Knowledge, Ethics 1xlong
Governing Shale Gas: Development, Citizen Participation and Decision Making in the US, Canada, Australia and Europe 1xlong
Handbook on green infrastructure planning design and implementation 1xlong
Holloway Prison : An Inside Story 1xlong
Horse People: Thoroughbred Culture in Lexington and Newmarket 1xebook
Housing Design for an Increasing Older Population 1xebook
Imagined Futures in Science, Technology and Society 1xlong
In the nature of landscape 1xlong
Indispensable Eyesores: An Anthropology of Undesired Buildings 1xebook
Infrastructures in Practice 1xebook
Interrogating Ellie 1xlong
Introducing the Sociology of Food and Eating 1xlong
Invitation to the Life Course: Towards New Understandings of Later Life 1xlong
Lives in Time and Place: The Problems and Promises of Developmental Science. 1xlong
London’s Turning: Thames Gateway-Prospects and Legacy 1xlong
Making and Growing: Anthropological Studies of Organisms and Artefacts 1xlong
Manhattan Transcripts 1xlong
Marcel Breuer: a Memoir 1xlong
Maritime Norfolk: Part Two 1xlong
New Monte Rosa Hut SAC Self-Sufficient Building in High Alps 2xlong
Nonlinear Time Series Analysis 1xlong
North Norfolk Coast 1xlong
Original Rockers 1xlong
Otto Wagner: Die Wiener Stadtbahn 1xlong
Palaces for the People: How to Build a More Equal and United Society 1xlong
Placemaking with children and Youth Participatory Practices for Planning Sustainable Communities 1xlong
Planetary Gentrification 1xlong
Prosthesis 1xlong
Reconceptualising Agency and Childhood: New perspectives in Childhood Studies 1xebook
Relational Architectural Ecologies 2xlong
Rethinking Vienna 1900 3xlong, 1xebook
Revisiting Divisions of Labour 1xlong
Roads Were Not Built for Cars: How Cyclists Were the First to Push for Good Roads & Became the Pioneers of Motoring 1xlong
Robot Ethics 2.0: From Autonomous Cars to Artificial Intelligence 1xlong
Small Towns, Austere Times: The Dialects of Deracinated Localism 1xlong
Space and the Memories of Violence: Landscapes of Erasure, Disappearance and Exception 1xlong
The Architecture of Psychoanalysis: Space of Transition 1xlong
The Architectures of Childhood: Children, Modern Architecture and Reconstruction in Post-war England 1xebook
The Culture of AI: Everyday Life and the Digital Revolution 1xlong
The Design of Childhood: How the Material World Shapes Independent Kids 1xlong
The Ethics of Invention 1xlong
The Evocative Object World 1xlong, 1xebook
The Flak Towers in Berlin, Hamburg and Vienna 1940 – 1950 1xlong
The Great Museum 1xlong
The Luminous Ground: The Nature of Order, Book 4 1xlong
The New Black Middle Class in South Africa 1xlong
The Phenomenon of Life 1xlong
The Process of Creating Life: The Nature of Order, Book 2 1xlong
The Setting of the Pearl: Vienna under Hitler 1xlong
The Structure of Light : Richard Kelly and the Illumination of Modern Architecture 1xlong
The Urban Design Reader 1xlong, 1xstc, 1xebook
The Works: Anatomy of a City 1xlong
Toward an Urban Ecology 1xlong
Urban Disaster Resilience: New Dimensions from International Practice in the Built Environment 1xebook
What Are Community Studies? 1xlong
What is the future? 1xlong
XML : Parliament 1xlong
Young people, Class and Place 1xlong

 

 

Books added to the Library by students in ECLS (Semester One 2018/19)

We have a service called “Books on Time” for students. This allows you to tell us about the books you need for your studies. If we don’t have the books you need, simply complete the web form and we’ll see if we can buy them. For books we already have in stock, if they are out on loan please make a reservation/hold request using Library Search.

Further information about Books on Time

In Semester one, academic year 2018/2019 we bought the following items after requests from students in ECLS.

There were 28 requests from 23 students totaling £2144.91 (4% of requests from undergraduates, 43% from Postgraduate taught and 53% from Postgraduate Research)

 

Title Now in stock
A Handbook for the Study of Mental Health: Social Contexts, Theories and Systems 1xlong
Acquisitions of Complex Arithmetic Skills 1xebook
Conducting Educational Design Research 1xlong
Cultures in Organizations: Three Perspectives 2xlong
Early Years Foundations: Critical Issues 1xlong
English as a Foreign Language in Saudi Arabia: New Insights into Teaching and Learning English 1xebook
English as a Foreign Language in Saudi Arabia: New Insights into Teaching and Learning English 1xlong
Everyday Arias: An Operatic Ethnography 1xebook
Handbook of Moral and Character Education 1xlong
Introducing Multimodality 2xlong
Life after Privatization 1xlong
Listening to Young Children: A Guide to Understanding and Using the Mosaic Approach 1xlong
Listening to Young Children: The Reader 1xlong
Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood 1xlong
Mindfulness-based treatment approaches 1xlong
Research and Social Change : A Relational Constructivist Approach 1xlong
Scouse: A Social and Cultural History 1xlong
Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Adolescents 1xlong
Stancetaking in Discourse 1xebook
Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice 1xlong
Student Voice Handbook: Bridging the Academic/Practitioner Divide 1xlong
Student Voice: The Instrument of Change 1xlong
Student-Centred Leadership 1xebook
The architecture of productive learning networks 1xlong
The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Multi-Competence 1xlong
The Methodologies of Positivism and Marxism 1xlong
University Partnerships with the corporate sector: Faculty experiences with for-profit matriculation pathway programs 1xlong
Visible Learning: Feedback 1xlong

 

GUEST POST: OSCOLA… Are you really getting the help you need?

Law ReportsLaura-Jayne Beattie, third year Law School student and Law Library Student Aide, has some top tips to help you find help with OSCOLA.


Need help with OSCOLA? Hate hearing this word? Then look no further than here and fear no more, as below I’ve summed up the best places for help with the bane of most Newcastle Law Student’s lives!

Listed below are resources available to help you master the OSCOLA referencing system. Some you may never have heard of, but all are there to ease you through the tricky issues you may face with referencing.

Law Library Staff

With super friendly staff available weekdays, and Stage 3 Student Aides on shift every evening and weekend, what more could you want? Please don’t feel afraid of coming to speak to us, we’re really not that scary (even though we may look it)!

Guides

The guides below are your first point-of-call (click on the links). However, there are sometimes particularly awkward sources. So, if the guides are confusing you or you can’t find the type of source you’re trying to reference within them, we’ll help you use them effectively to find what you need. Just show us what you’re wanting to reference, and we’ll try our very best to help you cite it right!

The Library’s guide on Managing Resources: OSCOLAThis is a good starting point for all things OSCOLA. Here you’ll find tips and links to guides and tutorials.

A-Z guideA hidden gem of library resources, listing many types primary and secondary sources in alphabetical order. Each type is hyperlinked, and when you click on it a general overview of how to cite that source and a few examples appear.

OSCOLA (4th edition) resources full guideA very detailed 55-page document, listing all types of sources (except for most international ones) and giving examples of how to cite sources throughout.

Quick Reference guideAn A4 document of how to cite the most common types of sources. A good document to print out and keep somewhere safe so you can always refer back to it!

OSCOLA 2006: Citing International Law guideThis is a separate guide, specifically for citing international law sources. From international treaties, to UN documents, it has it all!

Hopefully this has all helped in some way. But just remember if you’re struggling to cite something, don’t cite it wrongly or remove it from your essay and pretend it never existed! Get help from the super easy resources above!

Where could maps take you?

So when does an Animal Science student need to use EDINA Digimap and GIS software?  The answer is not all do, but you never know where your dissertation project may take you, and what software may help your research or your presentation or visualisation of results.

Grace’s dissertation took her to Sunderland to road test the country’s first gas sniffer dog.  Collaborating with an Earth Science student to help her use the mapping products and with training from the geosciences team in using GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) accurate to 2cm, she plotted the gas leaks and successful finds by her faithful four legged co-worker.  The team demonstrated that a dog’s nose is as good conventional gas detection equipment, and could be very helpful with difficult to trace gas leaks.

Sniffer dog in high vis finds gas leak
Sniffer dog, image used with permission from Dr Catherine Douglas, School of Natural and Environmental Sciences.
Digimap illustrating gas leaks detected
Map created by student using EDINA Digimap https://digimap.edina.ac.uk/ and used with permission by Dr Catherine Douglas, School of Natural and Environmental Sciences.

With many thanks to Dr Catherine Douglas, School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, for providing this content.

See what is available to you on the Maps Guide and take up opportunities to collaborate or share good practice with other disciplines. You never know where it might lead!

Please note: EDINA Digimap requires registration before use.

Literature Online upgrade

The literary research database, Literature Online (LION) has had an exciting new upgrade.

LION, which enables you to research international literature of all genres in books and journals, together with 350,000 works of poetry, prose and drama from the 8th century to the present, is now hosted on Proquest’s main platform. It also has good coverage of related areas such as linguistics, philosophy, classics and film studies.

The new site includes the following improvements:

  • new content will be available more quickly
  • clearer search options to help you focus your search
  • improved author pages
  • you can now cross-search LION along with other Proquest databases, such as Early English Books Online, The Guardian/Observer/New York Times newspaper archives, plus thousands of journal articles in other subject areas.

Not quite ready to switch? The old LION platform will still be available until August 2019, but we would encourage you to try the new LION sooner rather than later!

New resource “Statista” available

We now have access to platform called Statista which is available through a subscription from the Business School.

This is an extensive statistics platform covering over 1.5 million data sets (and adding an additional 500 each day) with revenue forecasts from 2015 to 2020 on over 400 industries.

Data is collected from over 18,000 sources covering over 75,000 different topics.

The platform can broken down into different elements including :

  • Statista‘s Digital Market Outlook offers forecasts, detailed market insights and key performance indicators for the most important areas of the Digital Economy, including various digital goods and services. https://www.statista.com/outlook/digital-markets
  • Statista’s Consumer Market Outlook provides in-depth market insights, key performance indexes and forecasts for the most important consumer markets. https://www.statista.com/outlook/consumer-markets
  • Statista’s industry reports provide the facts needed to understand an industry. The reports are clearly structured, easy to understand and present not only numerical data on areas such as trends in turnover and revenue, but also on industry strengths and weaknesses.  Updated annually, these reports contain the most recent and relevant data. https://www.statista.com/industry-reports
  • Statista’s dossiers are in-house reports which contain the most recent and relevant statistics concerning a single subject. Regular updates and routine additions ensure that Statista’s 4,000 dossiers are always up to date https://www.statista.com/dossiers

This short video from Statista give a nice overview of the different search functionalities – https://vimeo.com/202712374

Access via https://www.statista.com/ or via the record on Library Search.  (If you are accessing on campus, the platform will authenticate using IP address. If you are accessing off campus you will be taken through EzProxy so access should be seamless if you’ve logged in previously using your Campus ID and password).

Reading list session for Business School academics

The University Library launched a new reading list system in September 2017. This system is fully embedded within Blackboard, so if you are a module leader you will see a link to the relevant reading list within the module area on Blackboard.

We have also been working on our internal processes, improving how we receive reading lists and manage requests for new books or Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) scans.

You will now find some help pages specifically for reading lists at: https://www.ncl.ac.uk/library/services/reading-lists/

(image taken from Jesper Sehested)

From August 2018 please use our new central email address readinglists@ncl.ac.uk

If you have a word document or module guide which contains your reading lists you can deposit this with us using this form.

The new system also allows academics to log into their reading list within Blackboard and make amendments directly on the system. This means you no longer need to send us an email asking for a new book to be purchased or to ask for CLA scans. Simply follow the instructions on our how to guide.

You can make amendments and additions at any point during the academic year directly onto the list. You can also export your online list into a word document or other teaching materials.

If you wish to attend some training regarding the system, please book a place via louise.gordon@ncl.ac.uk for one of the sessions we’ve arranged below:

Thursday 17th January 10-11am

Thursday 17th January 11-12pm

Room 3.03, Business School

 

Managing your References: EndNote and OSCOLA

Recipe for referencing: Newcastle University Library

“Should I use EndNote as a way to manage my references?” is often a question we get asked. We wish that there was a simple answer to that question, but there isn’t! It all depends on how many references you have, how you like to work and if you are willing to make time to learn how to use EndNote properly. You see, while EndNote is tool that can make your academic life easier (for example, it can help you build a collection of references, insert references into your work and create bibliographies), it will only save you time, if you invest time NOW.

So if you’re using the OSCOLA referencing style and weighing up whether to use EndNote or not, then you might want to consider the following:

  • You need to have a good grasp of the OSCOLA fundamentals before you even start with EndNote. If you need a refresher on OSCOLA, then check out the OSCOLA referencing guide first before even looking at EndNote.
  • EndNote will not do EVERYTHING for you. You will still need to manually input and amend your references to ensure your footnotes and bibliography comply with OSCOLA.
  • Have you got the time to invest in EndNote before using it? We strongly recommend that you make a start using EndNote from the beginning, rather than in the middle or at the end, of your research.
  • How do you want to use EndNote? Some people decide to use it simply as a storage place for their references and PDFs and leave it at that. Others use it both as a storage place, as well as a tool to help them cite.

Still not sure? Watch the video below to see how to use OSCOLA style and the Cite While You Write feature in Word. Then take a look at the OSCOLA and EndNote guide and see if it’s something you’d like to start using.

Any questions? Have a look at our Frequently Asked Questions to see if it’s been asked before. If not, then do get in touch via Library Help

 

Recipe for Referencing: EndNote

What is EndNote?

The official blurb on EndNote is that it is “…the industry standard software tool for publishing and managing bibliographies, citations and references.”

Have you drifted off yet? Don’t – read on!

EndNote takes a little getting used to and we recommend you familiarise yourself with it at the start of your research process. But as Library Staff, we wouldn’t spend a significant amount of time demonstrating and training our academic staff and students on what EndNote is, and how to use it, if we didn’t think it was valuable. It will save you a huge amount of time in terms of writing up your assignments.

Essentially, you can use EndNote to create and organise a personal library of resources relevant to your research. You can import references from Library Search, and a huge range of databases such as Scopus, Web of Science, IEEE Xplore and Business Source Complete. You can ask EndNote to locate the full-text PDFs of the resources you are going to use in your research, and you can annotate them as you wish too. Did you know you can instruct Google Scholar to import references into EndNote? No? Try it. Finally, if you already have materials stored in your home folder (H:\) then you can attach them to a manually-created reference within EndNote, bringing all your research together in one place.

In addition to organising your references (and this is the clever bit) you can then get EndNote to ‘talk’ to your word processing software, e.g. Microsoft Word, and insert the citations into your work for you in your chosen referencing style, e.g. Harvard at Newcastle, Vancouver, APA or MLA. If you don’t want to do that, then EndNote will also allow you to create an independent bibliography of your references, saving you an awful lot of typing.

Using EndNote

Intrigued? You should be. Take a look at our EndNote Guide. It contains all the introductory information you need, step-by-step workbooks to train yourself on the use of EndNote (the Desktop and Online versions), videos, useful FAQs, and contacts for help, should you need it.

Finally, Newcastle University provides support for EndNote but it is not compulsory to use. You may prefer Mendeley, Zotero, RefWorks or another piece of bibliographic management software. That’s fine, whatever makes your referencing lives easier. Go on, give them a try.

Referencing with the Harvard cook book

Harvard at Newcastle is the most frequently used referencing style and if your school does not have a preferred style, it is the the one that we would recommend. This is because there is the most comprehensive guidance available for Harvard and it is a style that can manage referencing all types of information. Whether you are referencing a book, news article, Instagram or market research, the Harvard at Newcastle style has got you covered.

There are many variations of Harvard but the one used at Newcastle can be found in Cite Them Right. Harvard uses an in-text citation (Millican, 2018, p.12) inserted in the text, coupled with a reference list at the end of the document, which provides the key. Cite Them Right  is available as a published book to borrow from the library and Cite Them Right Online provides the same comprehensive guidance in a searchable interface that can be accessed anywhere online. It includes guidance about how to reference just about every type of information you can think of, including the more tricky online sources such as social media.

You will find the Harvard at Newcastle style in EndNote on campus PCs and through the RAS, and are able to download the style from our EndNote guide if you are using it locally on your own device. We’ve also included some useful tips and advice about getting to grips with Harvard on our referencing guide.