An invitation to review Audience Interaction Systems (AIS)

In 2022 a task group was set up to review our centrally supported audience interaction system, Ombea. As part of our remit, we are establishing user requirements for a system of this type, and inviting other suppliers to demonstrate their own AIS systems.

All the systems that will be demonstrated are established suppliers with experience of working with higher education institutions and could be viable options to replace Ombea, therefore colleague opinion of the available options is very important. After initial consultation, we have five suppliers who are interested in sharing their product.

The systems and dates of the demonstrations are:

  • Poll Everywhere – Tuesday 7th February 15:00-16:00
  • Vevox – Wednesday 8th February 14:00-15:00 
  • Slido – Friday 17th February 15:00-16:00
  • Kahoot – Monday 20th February 10:30-11:30
  • Mentimeter – Wednesday 8th March 12:00-13:00

To book a place to attend any of the demonstrations or to request links to the recordings please complete this booking form. After attending the demonstrations you will be sent a short form to complete to tell us what you thought of the system.

Any queries about the demonstrations or AIS review should be sent to the project team via ltds@ncl.ac.uk

Taking Ctrl: Paste text without Formatting

The Problem

I often copy and paste bits of text from one place to another, but don’t necessarily want the formatting that comes with the text. Just using Ctrl + V, or selecting ‘paste’ brings that formatting across. This means that text might look ‘odd’ when pasting it into another document, or something like a Canvas page.

The Method

  • Windows: Ctrl + Shift + V
  • Mac: Option + Shift + Command + V

The Solution

This means you just keep the characters, meaning your pasted text looks the same as the rest. This works in lots of desktop applications.

Microsoft Applications

To do this in Word, right-click and select ‘paste without formatting’ as below.

Try it today!

How did you do that so fast? Introducing Taking Ctrl

Introducing a new series – Taking Ctrl – a guide to keyboard shortcuts that can save you time!

Many of the tasks we do using the computer have a ready keyboard shortcut to speed up the task, though we might not always know what these are. We have asked the FMS TEL team to share their favourite keyboard shortcuts in this series. This is the team at their most geeky – enjoy, and see how much time you can save!

Our first keyboard shortcut is Windows key + E. This opens up your file explorer – much faster than looking for that icon.

New Year’s Resolutions

Whether you’re planning to try something new, or simply get organised, take a look at this selection of FMS TEL Blog Posts to kick start your January.

Whether you’re planning to try something new, or simply get organised, take a look at this selection of FMS TEL Blog Posts to kick start your January.

Enrol in the FMS TEL Canvas Community on Canvas or the MLE to access our full guides, previous training webinars and a range of other resources.

2022 Roundup

This post summarises posts from 2022 – thank you to all of our contributors!

We hope you have enjoyed learning more about the work we do in FMS TEL, below are a few areas we covered and successes we had in 2022. If you have any suggestions for content for 2023 we would love to hear from you.


Awards and Prizes

Ashley Reynolds and Eleanor Gordon were delighted to be announced winners of the ‘Best Video Award’ during the NU Teaching & Learning Conference for their video ‘Creating and using animations to explain concepts’.

Eleanor Gordon (left) and Ashley Reynolds (right)

Work done by the School of Dentistry and FMS TEL Team won first prize at the Trans-European Pedagogic Anatomical Research Group Hybrid Conference this year, for the presentation on ‘Adopting a flexible approach to professional anatomy spotter exams during COVID’. Newcastle Staff can view the poster here for an overview or read the internal news item on SharePoint.


2022 Conferences

For the second year running we ran our very own FMS TEL conference. We had sessions on Accessibility, Augmented Reality, Lab Teaching, Escape Rooms and more. The materials are available on the FMS TEL Conference 2022 page.

Several members of the FMS TEL team also attended the NULT Conference this year, giving strong representation of the team. We delivered sessions on Developing audio commentated interviews, Designing Convertible Teaching and Using Canvas Commons.


Technology, Software and Systems

WRS Screenshot: individual workload summary

This year we showcased The FMS Workload Reporting System (WRS) and the new Personal Tutoring Application.

We explored 3D scanners and 360° Cameras and advanced our use of Canvas and PowerPoint.


Tips and Guides

We did quick fix posts for Screen Sharing with Presenter View, Additional scroll bars in canvas and Searching Outlook Emails.

We have shared guides on Captioning, Transcription and, how to improve teaching with Motion tracking in Recorded Presentations and the use of timers in synchronous teaching.

Assessment and Feedback were important topics this year with posts on Instant Feedback, Live Feedback, Virtual Oral Presentations and Effective Rubrics.


Thank You!

The blog is edited by a different FMS TEL team member every month, and many team members have taken on this task, as well as contributing posts to the blog – thank you to all of you! Our thanks also go to those colleagues who have offered their examples of practice for us to showcase here. We look forward to working with many more of you in 2023.

FMS TEL Conference 2022 – behind the scenes

This post is a review of the conference experience by FMS TEL members John Keogan and Andy Stokes.

This years conference was going to be a bit different to any conference we had ran in the past, the decision was made for the 2022 conference to be hybrid! We would run in-person presentations, online only sessions, and some sessions would be a hybrid of both. We were excited to take advantage of the video-conferencing technologies on offer within the University.

Using lessons learnt from last years online version, we set out tasks to complete and deadlines to meet.

The Tasks

clipboard with list

We divided the main tasks between us and ran through the list of jobs involved in preparing for the conference. We quickly realised that there was lot more involved than we initially thought!

The main tasks included:

  • timetabling
  • booking rooms
  • communications (including mail merges)
  • creating online conference materials

One aspect of the preparation was getting word out about the conference. We approached schools within the faculty and asked them to put up posters in areas with heavy footfall, as well as staffrooms. We put up posters in cafes, corridors and even lifts – please let us know if you saw them! We also requested that the campus messaging screens carried information about the conference in FMS areas. 

Tips

Room Bookings

  • Consider your criteria before booking, for example:
    • ‘Is the room big enough?’
    • ‘Do the speakers work?’
    • ‘Can we connect a laptop to the projectors?’
  • The room bookings website is not always accurate when you nominate the relative criteria; i.e. ‘Hybrid’, ‘videoconference’ etc.
  • Give yourself enough time to visit the rooms in person (It’s also worthwhile booking the rooms for when you plan to test them, as they can be snapped up pretty quickly in term time).
  • Reserved your rooms well in advance! 

Technology

  • Contact the Audio Visual team for a demonstration of the hybrid technology. They showed us how to set up and use the cameras and mics, and also how to troubleshoot common problems.
  • Consider your booking platform and its limitations, we used workshops.ncl which required us to use an iCal maker so delegates could add the events to their diaries.
  • Familiarise yourself with video editing software. As a team we edited the recordings using a mix of ReCap, Premiere Pro and Adobe Rush.
  • Schedule a block of time to review captions. We have some excellent posts on how to edit your captions.

Conclusion

Overall, the conference was a great success and we all enjoyed our time being part of the 2022 FMS TEL Conference team.

Being new to running a conference we developed skills and knowledge during the journey. The encouragement and support from our team helped ensure that we fulfilled our tasks and that looming deadlines were met.

We learned things that we will do different, or better, next year and we hope the tips shared in this post will be a good starting point for anyone wanting to run their own conference.

Assessment and Marking Refresher

The January assessment period will be upon us all very soon. Why not take some time over the next few weeks to refresh your knowledge.

Below are a few resources previously delivered or created by the FMS TEL team:


🎦 Canvas Assessment Training 

  • Setting Up Assessments
  • Creating Rubrics
  • Turnitin Plagiarism Detection
  • Marking and Moderation

🎦 Effective Rubrics

  • Designing Effective Rubrics for Marking and Feedback
  • Best practice when deciding how to put your rubric together
  • Rubric design workflow
  • Setting up and using Rubrics in Turnitin

🎦 Adaptive Release Feedback

  • Comments before grades
  • Technological affordances available
  • Recorded audio feedback

📄 Multiple Markers 

  • How to allocate students to a marker
  • How to filter Speedgrader to see only your marking section

We ALL Draw!

During the FMS TEL Conference, Leonard Shapiro of the University of Cape Town presented an overview of the many ways in which people draw, dispelled myths about the ‘quality’ of a drawing, and covered some of the many ways in which drawing can be useful in learning and in communication once we stop judging ourselves on our artistic skill.

You can watch Leonard’s talk in Panopto.

The university has a range of tools that allow us to draw for learning and communication, and draw collaboratively when teaching in person and online, such as smart boards, interactive whiteboards, and collaborative whiteboards in Zoom and Teams, as well as note making apps on devices we have in our pockets.

Drawing as a method to understand 3D anatomical structures is central to Leonard’s work – how might drawing allow your students to take a different viewpoint in your subject?

You may also wish to consider the approaches and methods used in the other linked FMS TEL videos below: